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Anonymous
12 hours ago

The Time Has Come for the CUA Faculty to Strike for Mandatory COVID Vaccinations. It would not be the first time. In April 1967, the board of trustees of Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C., dismissed Father Charles Curran from his position as theology professor without any hearing or explanation. In response, the CUA faculty led a campus-wide strike in support of Curran, which succeeded in having Curran reinstated as a professor. The story of the successful strike narrated below draws from never-before published material from the archives of CUA and the personal papers of key bishops on the CUA… Read more »

Anonymous
10 hours ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I can see the headline: “Faculty at small Catholic college strike for vaccination mandate.”

Anonymous
10 hours ago
Reply to  Anonymous

First, try to test whether there’s a sufficient level of the sentiment reflected in this article: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/07/27/health/coronavirus-vaccination-hesitancy-delta.html?action=click&module=Spotlight&pgtype=Homepage

Anonymous
10 hours ago
Reply to  Anonymous

“The story of the successful strike….”? By what measure was it successful? Curran left the university, which declined to its current US news ranking of 149 and a position where it is not even mentioned in references to “leading Catholic universities” in the country.

Anonymous
14 hours ago

The VA has joined a growing list of healthcare institutions requiring Covid-19 vaccine for all of their employees
https://www.nytimes.com/2021/07/26/us/politics/veterans-affairs-coronavirus-covid-19.html

FYI: The Conway School of Nursing already requires covid-19 vaccination for all nursing students.

Anonymous
10 hours ago
Reply to  Anonymous

If the Conway school can mandate vaccines, why can’t the deans of other individual schools?

Anonymous
1 day ago

We could create a change. org petition to mandate covid vaccines for the CUA community

Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Where are Garvey and the Trustees getting medical/scientific advice on the vaccine issue? CUA doesn’t have the benefit of a medical school or public health academic center. Are there any physicians on the board?

Anonymous
12 hours ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The current posted CUA BoT roster includes Anne E. O’Donnell, M.D., Arlington, Va.

The Medical Director of CUA Student Health is a board-certified family physician. Have heard that she favors mandating covid vaccination at CUA, but cannot confirm. For sure, student health strongly recommends covid vaccination.
https://health.catholic.edu/immunizations/index.html

Anonymous
2 hours ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Hard to believe Garvey would have gone out on this limb without strong BoT support for it.

Anonymous
1 day ago

Keep the Faith – Recall How Gallaudet University Dealt with Its Board of Trustees in 1988

See https://boundarystones.weta.org/2021/07/21/bet-gallaudet

Anonymous
1 day ago

FYI – “The Delta variant doesn’t want you back in the office”; 26 Jul 2021

I wonder if President Garvey is aware of the situation.

https://www.axios.com/coronavirus-delta-office-reopening-788aa0ae-da89-4eac-a337-ef6b59d38267.html?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter_axioswhatsnext&stream=science

Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Anonymous

As the virus situation grows worse each day and more and more institutions of various kinds impose vaccine mandates, is CUA really going to be one of the only organizations in the country that doesn’t? Really?

Anonymous
1 day ago

FYI – “Boston College stands ‘resolute’ amid controversy over vaccine requirement”; 26 Jul 2021

https://www.ncronline.org/news/coronavirus/boston-college-stands-resolute-amid-controversy-over-vaccine-requirement

Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The article refers to “several of the nation’s leading Catholic universities and colleges” and names half a dozen or so. No mention anywhere in the article of CUA. Doesn’t that tell you something?

Last edited 1 day ago by Anonymous
Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Obviously and sadly, it tells me that CUA is unfortunately not one of America’s leading Catholic Universities.

Message to President Garvey – If you are listening and if you are seriously concerned, please tell us what are you doing to change this situation.

Please save us from your normal pious platitudes and just tell the CUA Family how you are specifically working to correct the situation.

What are you specifically doing to address CUA’s:
• Concerns about the COVID virus;
• Dwindling enrollments – including graduate students;
• Shockingly low national ranking; and its
• Weakened and disenfranchised faculty.

Anonymous
4 hours ago
Reply to  Anonymous

However much the CUA administration may advocate voluntary vaccinations, its refusal to require them is casting the university as some kind of nutty, extremist, anti-science institution. Just what prospective freshmen looking for “research” opportunities hope to find.

Anonymous
3 days ago

A simple thought exercise: If a member of the CUA community returns to campus this Fall and contracts COVID and dies from it, will Pres. Garvey be able to say, “I did everything reasonably within my power to prevent that?” Will each member of the BoT be able to say that? Without a vaccine mandate, I don’t see how any of them could.

Anonymous
2 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Your point is well taken.

I pray that CUA will not lose a member of its family to COVD.

And I also fervently pray that President Garvey and “his” BOT will run your Gedanken experiment and take positive steps to protect the CUA family accordingly.

Sadly, I will not be holding my breath.

Admin

FA president Janet Selway has written a letter to the editor of NCR – “Your thoughts on requiring Covid-19 vaccines,” 7/23/21 : As a tenured associate professor of the Catholic University of America, I applaud your editorial. I am a licensed nurse practitioner with a research doctorate from Johns Hopkins University, the president of the CUA faculty assembly, and the incoming CUA academic senate representative for the Conway School of Nursing. The majority of CUA faculty favor a mandatory COVID-19 vaccine policy as evidenced by two passed academic senate resolutions, a nursing faculty position statement, a professional school survey by… Read more »

Anonymous
4 days ago

Bravo.

Anonymous
4 days ago

Great posting.

Maybe if enough parents read it, they can make their voices heard by President Garvey and “his” BOT.

However, I fear that the BOT includes many bishops who are against both the Pope and COVID vaccinations.

Anonymous
4 days ago

Well done!

Anonymous
3 days ago

I find the following statement in Garvey’s July 16 letter to be intriguing: “We have assumed that we will likely reach a level of immunity comparable to schools that have required vaccinations but permitted liberal exceptions.” Is there any empirical data that makes this assumption plausible? Are permitted exceptions to the vaccine mandate at, say, GW, so “liberal” as to permit a reasonable expectation that a significant number of people will go unvaccinated? Or is he just winging it with this statement? https://president.catholic.edu/communications/letters/what-is-your-immunization-status.html

Anonymous
2 days ago

So let’s talk about cooperation with evil:

“Every infected person, anywhere in the world, offers the coronavirus another opportunity to morph into a new variant. The more infections there are globally, the more likely new variants will arise.

“The United States will be vulnerable to every one of them until it can immunize millions of people who now refuse to get the vaccine, are still persuadable but hesitant, or have not yet gained access. The unvaccinated will set the country on fire over and over again.”

From: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/07/25/health/coronavirus-vaccine-refusal.html:

Last edited 2 days ago by Anonymous
Anonymous
5 days ago

FYI – “Trinity Washington University forgives $1.8 million in student debt”

Trinity Washington University will clear the unpaid balances of 400 undergraduates and relieve them of the debt that often hinders students from completing college.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2021/07/22/trinity-washington-university-forgives-18-million-student-debt?utm_source=Inside+Higher+Ed&utm_campaign=2ba47a6743-DNU_2021_COPY_02&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_1fcbc04421-2ba47a6743-236411834&mc_cid=2ba47a6743&mc_eid=0ee291b326

Anonymous
6 days ago

College Dorms Are Money-Makers for Universities.

But given CUA’s Proclaimed Concern About Its Affordability, I Hope That CUA Has Relaxed Its Requirements About Student Living on Campus.

See https://www.nerdwallet.com/article/loans/student-loans/data-dorm-costs

Anonymous
6 days ago

The Association of Catholic Schools of Nursing voted to support a covid vaccine policy drafted by Alvernia University. The policy in part says:
“Nursing students (even those who may have been granted an exemption to the university’s vaccination requirement for students returning to campus in fall 2021) should be vaccinated by one of the currently approved vaccines (Pfizer, Moderna, or Johnson & Johnson) in order to be able to successfully complete clinical coursework”.
 
The Association of Catholic Schools of Nursing is convened by the Catholic Health Association.

Last edited 6 days ago by Anonymous
Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Same as CSON. Students wont be allowed do clinicals without vax. Cson has their own statement about mandating the vax…it was ignored by Garvey and co.

Anonymous
6 days ago

Hope Springs EternalUS universities anticipating major leadership turnover post-Covid.Easing of pandemic a moment for many campus presidents to take a break and others to be pushed out July 21, 2021  Paul Basken US universities are showing signs of heavy leadership turnover that is expected to explode in the coming year as institutions recover from the pandemic and reassess, recruitment experts said. “This is the time to do it,” said Shelli Herman, president and founder of Shelli Herman and Associates, an executive search firm in Los Angeles. “If people were thinking: ‘There is a glimmer in my mind that I might retire in… Read more »

Anonymous
6 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

And what do you hope to get in replacement? Another mid-level cleric with a less stellar education, narrower life experience and more meager record of accomplishment? Another brilliant but uncommitted academic who quits before his first term is up?

Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

hopefully someone who can make a decision in comparison to now

Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Garvey has made plenty of decisions, including a major restructuring of the Board of Trustees that has facilitated an unprecedented level of fundraising.

Anonymous
4 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

OK, once again you have made your point about the restructured BOT and the unprecedented level of fundraising whenever anyone questions Garvey’s performance.

So, please tell us SPECIFICALLY AND QUANTITATIVELY what Garvey and “his” BOT have done to address CUA’s existential problems involving CUA’s:
(1) Abysmal national ranking;
(2) Decreasing student enrollments;
(3) Small amount of sponsored research (Physics excepted);
(4) Movement to the radical right; and an
(4) Underpaid and demoralized faculty.

And please don’t respond with the meaningless comment that, “These things take time”.

Anonymous
4 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Just because the truth is inconvenient for your position doesn’t mean something isn’t true. And, yes, after 130 years of lackluster leadership, turning the institution around does take time. The cure for items (1) through (3) on your list begins with money, and Garvey has raised more money than any other president in the university’s history. The first item (4) on your list is hyperbole and pretty far removed from the university’s core concerns. The fix for your second item (4) is to make sure that every faculty member hired can count.

Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Pray tell, what specifically, has Mr Garvey done with all the money that “he has raised” to address Items (1) through (3)?

Anonymous
6 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

CUA President John Garvey’s Misguided View of Religious Liberty February 25, 2012 By Peter N. Kirstein, History Professor at Xavier University John Garvey, president of censured Catholic University of America (CUA), a pontifical university that has a dismal record of aggressively promoting conformity to religious theological dogma over academic freedom, is protesting the government’s alleged encroachment on Catholic and religious institutions across the spectrum of American life. Beware of university presidents who believe truth is not subject to continuous skepticism and revisionism! This ironic state-within-a-state approach that asserts the right to carve out a religious national sovereignty even takes aim… Read more »

Anonymous
6 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Well, it is simply not true that CUA “removed a tenured, liberal theologian, Reverand Charles E. Curran, from the classroom.” Curran retained his tenure and was free to teach theology except for the ecclesiastical courses. If Prof. Kirstein can’t get this part right, maybe the rest of what he has to say should be viewed with a measure of skepticism.

Snopes
1 day ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Your confident statement that, “It is “simply not true” indicates that you may be confused by facts.

Maybe this will help.

See https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/local/1989/03/01/curran-loses-suit-against-catholic-u/dc4bbc51-55d1-4577-a1cc-ebc2220e52be/

Anonymous
7 days ago

https://engage.catholic.edu/stories/conway-school-nursing-receives-campaign-cup
Dean McMullen deserves the credit for this cup. Advancement should engrave her name on it

Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

She should….but they barely mention her in the articles about the new nursing building..her name should be on the cornerstone there as she was the one who fundraised all of the money for it…instead, Garvey and co. get the praise. CUA is backwards

Anonymous
7 days ago

UM faculty survey: Most support mandatory COVID-19 vaccinationKaren Bouffard The Detroit News 17 July 2021 Most instructors at the University of Michigan think COVID-19 vaccination should be mandatory for all faculty, staff and students, with limited medical or religious exceptions — or if not, instructors should be able to opt out of in-person instruction, according to results of an informal survey obtained by The Detroit News.  Faculty Senate members, clinical faculty and lecturers were asked whether they would support a university mandate that all students, faculty and staff be vaccinated, with limited medical and religious exceptions — an expansion of a current requirement for… Read more »

Anonymous
8 days ago

Yet more vindication of Pres. Garvey’s strategy to aggressively pursue institutional advancement and to restructure the Board of Trustees in furtherance of that effort. Ascension’s CEO recently went on CUA’s Board as part of the expansion of lay membership initiated by Garvey. https://engage.catholic.edu/stories/ascension-dedicates-3m-expand-catholicus-online-nursing-programs

Anonymous
8 days ago

FYI – 2020-21 Faculty Compensation Survey Results

In case you missed the AAUP study, see

https://www.aaup.org/2020-21-faculty-compensation-survey-results

Anonymous
8 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

More commentary re recently posted AAUP Report AAUP says COVID-19 and years of unstable funding have led to “an existential threat to shared governance and academic freedom.”ByScott Jaschik July 19, 2021    The American Association of University Professors sees “an existential threat to shared governance and academic freedom” resulting from the economic and other hardships facing most faculty members, according to a new report. The report builds on a report the AAUP issued in April on faculty salaries for the year (which fell, when adjusted for inflation, for the first time since 2011-12) but adds additional information on how COVID-19 affected the… Read more »

Anonymous
9 days ago

Could This Be Impacting CUA’s Enrollment?

American High School Students Are Flocking to European Colleges

See https://observer.com/2021/07/us-high-school-graduate-attend-europe-university-trend/

Anonymous
9 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Seems unlikely to have a material impact. See the post further down in this forum about American U’s increasing freshman enrollment.

Anonymous
10 days ago

CSON is being ignored on their stance that students/faculty/staff should be vaxed. What else is new though?

Anonymous
9 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Remember, CUA President Garvey is a lawyer.

Unfortunately, he keeps his own counsel.

Anonymous
10 days ago

Here is the WSJ aricle that was referenced in an earlier post. I sure hope that CUA would never let their students get into the dire post-graduation finnancial situations described in this article. _____________________________________________ ‘Financially Hobbled for Life’: The Elite Master’s Degrees That Don’t Pay Off By Melissa Korn Wall Street Journal July 8, 2021 Columbia and other top universities push master’s programs that fail to generate enough income for graduates to keep up with si“-figure federal loans Recent film program graduates of Columbia University who took out federal student loans had a median debt of $181,000. Yet two years… Read more »

Anonymous
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Especially in the creative fields, which seem to be the article’s focus, it should be obvious that even an Ivy degree will be of little help if you don’t have the chops.

Last edited 10 days ago by Anonymous
Anonymous
11 days ago

Statement from the Villanova University President requiring vaccines. Makes CUA more of an “outlier” in President Garvey’s words. https://www1.villanova.edu/university/return-to-campus/vaccine-information.html

Anonymous
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Thanks for posting this wonderful letter from Villanova University’s President, Rev, Peter M. Donohue (https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/president/about_office/biography.html)
I wish that CUA’s president would take some cues from Fr Donohue’s letter to the Villanova Family.

By the way, Fr Donohue received his MA in Theater from CUA. I suspect that he was influenced by Fr Hartke.

Anonymous
11 days ago

Opinion – CUA’s Metropolitan School of Professional Studies is Similar to What Many “Elite Universities” are Doing to Make Money. Ergo, CUA must be “elite”.

Master’s degrees are the second biggest scam in higher education.

https://slate.com/business/2021/07/masters-degrees-debt-loans-worth-it.html?via=rss_flipboard

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

So professors should refuse to teach courses leading to master’s degrees, lest they be complicit in evil?

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Even if the Yale or Harvard offering is a “scam” in terms of cost, content and/or job prospects, at least you’ve purchased the right to tack the Yale or Harvard credential onto your LinkIn profile. Outside that tier of schools, you don’t even get that benefit.

Anonymous
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

As the parent of a rising senior who is looking at staying at Catholic for her master’s degree in the humanities, this was the most disappointing of many disappointing posts by this faculty assembly.

I will now work very hard to convince her not to attend Catholic for that masters degree if this is the attitude that you want to share with your tuition-paying customers.

YOU, THE FACULTY will be putting yourselves out of business. You are the elitists, and from what I have read on this forum, you can’t afford to be the elitists.

Physicians, heal yourselves.

Anonymous
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Dear Parent – I respectfully think that you missed the point the poster was trying to make. The point is that students in need of loans must be careful not to take on such a level of debt that it will be almost impossible for them to repay it with their future earnings. Unfortunately, this is particularly true for degrees in the humanities – regardless of the university of college. If you can afford to pay for your daughter’s graduate school expenses, then I hope that she will continue her studies at CUA. It would be good for her and… Read more »

Anonymous
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Perhaps the best endorsement of CUA is the posting parent’s daughter, who, after nearly four years here, is considering staying on.

Anonymous
9 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

As another parent, I find the faculty posts on this site very disappointing.  I’m beyond being annoyed that hard-earned money has gone to pay for some of the people (not all) here who make childish and disrespectful comments about the school and its leaders (even by name!). Maybe I’m old school, but those of us that don’t work in a university owe a duty of loyalty to our employers.  It is really shocking to see, of all people, college professors who can’t live with the school’s decisions snipe from the sidelines rather than muster the self-respect to move on.  Some of these… Read more »

Anonymous
9 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Dear Parent – I’m “old school” as well, but apparently you and I have different perspectives on loyalty. When I was a teacher, I felt that I owed my loyalty to my students – not to the school administration. When I was a scientific researcher in the public sector, I felt that I owed my loyalty to my sponsors – not to my company. In my opinion, the character of CUA’s faculty is beyond reproach and the CUA faculty is absolutely not responsible for CUA’s low national ranking and dwindling enrollments. Your suggestion that the CUA Faculty just “live with… Read more »

Anonymous
11 days ago

Am I the only one who is concerned about CUA’s close connection to the Federalist Society?

https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2021/07/federalist-society-insurrection-cowards.html?via=rss_flipboard

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

There is nothing sinister about the Federalist Society. It’s conservative, but a large number of sane and responsible lawyers and judges are members. They take a legitimate view of our constitutional order, even if you disagree with it, as many other people do. The writer of the linked essay has an ax to grind, arising from a particular incident that he describes in the opening paragraph.

Anonymous
9 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Yes.

Anonymous
11 days ago

Just received the message trying to again survey the university community about vaccination status. I am horrified by the lack of a campuswide vaccination policy. I am disappointed there has been no additional information for faculty announced since February. I want my students to wear masks and don’t know if I can require it.

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The “survey” merely asks faculty/staff respondents to indicate whether they have been vaccinated or not. There was no requirement to upload any proof of vaccination status. So, that’s a bit disconcerting…

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

So if you’re anti-vax and you want to try to make sure no mandate is issued, you falsely answer “yes I’m vaccinated”, and the administration then says: “see – we told you: no need for mandatory vax rule because people are doing it voluntarily”

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

An excellent time for Garvey’s COVID-19 committee to be on hiatus.

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

It’s disappointing that the Conway nursing school faculty hasn’t signed a statement condemning the university’s refusal to require vaccination.

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Note this statement in Garvey’s email: “Many people are confident they will survive a bout of COVID, but some are more apprehensive.” Notably, Garvey provides no information to counter the first part of the statement. Data from reliable sources is available. See below. The credibility gap with this administration only grows wider.

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/coronavirus-and-covid-19-younger-adults-are-at-risk-too

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The quoted language is embarrassing. Even if I’m “confident” that I will “survive a bout of COVID”, that optimism is irrelevant to whether someone to whom I transmit the disease will survive. It is also irrelevant to whether my survival — or that of someone to whom I transmit the disease — will nevertheless come at the price of disabling “long haul” symptoms.

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

No matter how “confident” one feels, this virus doesn’t care. From an Atlantic article today on the outbreak in Missouri: https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2021/07/delta-missouri-pandemic-surge/619456/ “Those ICUs are also filling with younger patients, in their 20s, 30s, and 40s, including many with no underlying health problems. In part, that’s because elderly people have been more likely to get vaccinated, leaving Delta with a younger pool of vulnerable hosts. While experts are still uncertain if Delta is deadlier than the original coronavirus, every physician and nurse in Missouri whom I spoke with told me that the 30- and 40-something COVID-19 patients they’re now seeing are much sicker than… Read more »

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The Conway School has spoken out quite a bit. They’re being ignored. Because people outside of the medical and scientific community clearly know better.

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Would it be within the authority of a Dean to mandate vaccination for his or her school’s students and faculty?

Anonymous
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Short answer: NO. The deans do not employ anyone. Only the President does. And frankly, some of the deans are just as arrogant on the side of “science” that I don’t want them making decisions on my behalf.

Janet Selway
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Position Statement of the Conway School of Nursing Faculty
This position statement was approved by 19 of 22 CUA nursing faculty and circulated at the CUA Academic Senate on May 12, 2021- at this meeting, two resolutions favoring a covid vaccination requirement for students, faculty & staff passed by a large majority vote. Since this date, the number of US institutions of higher learning with a mandated covid-vaccination policy has increased from 237 to 583.

Anonymous
8 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

They came out with a statement in May…it was pretty much ignored by Garvey

Anonymous
12 days ago

An important editorial from National Catholic Reporter about university vaccination policy from a Catholic perspective: https://www.ncronline.org/news/coronavirus/editorial-us-catholic-colleges-and-churches-should-require-vaccination

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I agree – this is an important editorial, and it is especially timely as the Delta variant is rapidly spreading.

Unfortunately, I doubt that either President Garvey or most of his hand-picked BOT members read the National Catholic Reporter.

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Only a few hours after this editorial was published, President Garvey is now surveying faculty /staff about their covid vaccine status. So maybe he read it. Perhaps we should all just email it to him.

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Garvey’s in a jam with Delta surging. If he does the rational thing by reconsidering and requiring vaccinations, he faces the ire of the fanatics. But if he doesn’t reverse course and the university suffers a significant outbreak, its reputation as a fringe outpost of religious crazies is sealed.

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I’m sorry, but the characterization of anybody who doesn’t believe we should mandate vaccines as “fanatics” is just uncharitable.
The article doesn’t mention the tense moral grounds that vaccines are on even taken voluntarily- no mention of aborted stem cells and unethical research that led to this. People have a right to conscientiously object to it, whether you like that reasoning or not.

If that’s a problem, this fringe outpost of crazies is happy to do without you.

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The USCCB encourages vaccinations, at least with Pfizer and Moderna: https://www.usccb.org/resources/memo-bishops-vaccines-covid-19

So does Pope Francis. Both he and Pope Emeritus Benedict got the vaccines. https://www.vaticannews.va/en/pope/news/2021-01/pope-francis-benedict-xvi-covid-19-vaccine.html

How is it that are you more of a moral authority than both the USCCB and two Popes?

Anonymous
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Is it possible to make the distinction between voluntarily accepting a vaccine as an individual vs. mandating it to an entire university by force? The first is understandable, the second is not and is certainly not supported by the Pope or the USCCB. Spare me the motte and bailey arguments here.

Anonymous
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Thank you for making this distinction.   Although the histrionics surrounding the vaccine are understandable given the uncertain evolution of the virus, people, like the OP, need to remember that, if they received the vaccine, they are protected.  The OP appears to believe that this right of self-determination and associated protection is not enough, that we must mandate that all receive the vaccine.  That mandate would raise serious questions with health implications for the new/returning students. We still are speaking about vaccines distributed under emergency use authorization.  This statement is not intended as a criticism; it merely is a factual statement about the status… Read more »

Anonymous
9 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

A couple of observations and questions. First, the paragraph laden with links to research data boils down to a particular, small, potential risk of the vaccine to student-age persons. As such, it doesn’t make a case for excluding older persons, like faculty and staff, from a vaccine mandate. Second, the proposition that an individual can protect himself by choosing to be vaccinated does not address the threat of continued mutations and their spread, as illustrated by the Delta variant. Is there any dispute that a non-vaccinated population enhances the opportunity for mutations and dissemination of new forms of the virus?… Read more »

Anonymous
9 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Regarding your points: “First, the paragraph laden with links to research data boils down to a particular, small, potential risk of the vaccine to student-age persons.”   >>Yes, but risk of what?  Read the link.  “Severe myocarditis weakens your heart so that the rest of your body doesn’t get enough blood. Clots can form in your heart, leading to a stroke or heart attack.”  Read the complications, which include heart failure.  The point is that a young, healthy person is not irrational being concerned about the risk and, thus, should be permitted to form a conclusion based on their consultation with their doctor about their… Read more »

Anonymous
9 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

It’s hyperbole, at least, to describe a COVID vaccination mandate as an “extreme measure[] involving the deprivation of individual decision making” when entering students have long been subject to a number of immunization requirements. See: https://policies.catholic.edu/students/studentlife/studenthealthsvcs/index.html

Anonymous
9 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

It is not hyperbole at all, and the comparison is inapposite and does not support a mandate.  Again, unlike other vaccines, this vaccine is being distributed under an emergency use authorization vaccine (https://www.fda.gov/vaccines-blood-biologics/vaccines/emergency-use-authorization-vaccines-explained).  It has not gone through the full FDA approval process (see prior post).  In addition, in a small number of cases, it may carry serious cardiological implications relative to the risk of death for the age group involved (https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/clinical-considerations/covid-19-vaccines-us.html; https://www.statista.com/statistics/1191568/reported-deaths-from-covid-by-age-us/).  Given that the risk concerns are legitimate for those individuals to assess with their physicians, and that the vaccine is available for older individuals and those whose risk analysis favors the vaccine, it… Read more »

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

In fact the crazies are relatively few in number, but their zealotry appears to have a disproportionately strong purchase on the institution and may very well sink it.

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Uncharitable? You know what’s uncharitable? Allowing your body to serve as a petri dish for the evolution of more virulent, vaccine-resistant pathogens and then exposing other humans to those deadly agents — that’s uncharitable.

Anonymous
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Charity requires voluntary decision and by definition cannot be forced. Making the distinction between taking the vaccine as an individual (which is indeed charitable) and forcing it for university enrollment (which is not) is important here.
If we’ve come to love the use of administrative fiat, there are plenty of “charitable requirements” such as mandatory Mass attendance I’d be happy to talk about.

Anonymous
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Unlike the case of vaccines, there is no scientific proof of a therapeutic benefit to Mass, so maybe you want to search for a different example. In any event, what’s been obscured is that all the vaccine mandates I’ve heard about include exemptions for genuine conscientious objection. Adoption of that model should satisfy the zealots in the CUA community, but I suspect it wouldn’t because they find the opportunity to wage culture war too compelling.

Anonymous
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Answer to Garvey’s “jam”: Leadership!

Anonymous
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

How does a survey of faculty/staff capture information about the vaccination rate of students?

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Good. Bishop Helmsing was correct in calling NCR “poisonous” and that it doesn’t deserve to have Catholic in the title.

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Context. The statement Bishop Helmsing made was in 1968: http://content.time.com/time/subscriber/article/0,33009,902459,00.html

Anonymous
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Additional context: Bishop Helmsing’s successor in 2013 similarly condemned NCR as being opposed to Church doctrine.
https://www.catholicculture.org/news/headlines/index.cfm?storyid=16911

Anonymous
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

What was their rap on NCR? That it reported the role of the hierarchy in covering up sex abuse?

Anonymous
14 days ago

CUA Receives Research Award from NASA Goddard’s Heliophysics Division; 13 July 2021

Congratulations to Research Professor, Robert Robinson of CUA’s Physics Department and his multi-university team.

For details, see:

https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/usra-selected-as-member-of-the-phaser-program-supporting-nasa-goddards-heliophysics-division-301332814.html

Anonymous
14 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Excellent news.

Anonymous
14 days ago
Anonymous
14 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Good for AU.

I wonder what their secret is

Anonymous
14 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I’m guessing they get a lot of kids who want to go to school in DC but didn’t get into G’town or GW. CUA gets some of those kids, too, but far fewer because of its strict religious identity. Meanwhile, CUA loses many other Catholic kids to more prestigious, better-known Catholic schools. In short, CUA has painted itself into some corner.

Last edited 14 days ago by Anonymous
Anonymous
13 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Perhaps data can help drive the understanding here. For instance, AU is a fine school, and it may be that there are kids who actually want to attend AU as their first choice school. Application and admissions data (e.g., schools to which students applied; schools where they were accepted or rejected; financial need; financial incentives; prestige metrics and their ranking of importance to students; applications by subject major, and others) would help assess what’s happening. Likewise, it would help to understand the impact of online and other tools that assist high school students in their efforts to target applications (self-selecting/self-rejecting schools)… Read more »

Anonymous
12 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I agree that data should trump speculation. I believe that the university hired consultants not long ago to advise on its enrollment struggle. As I recall, the consultants concluded that CUA’s “we’re more Catholic” branding isn’t likely to boost its demand among applicants. But we don’t need consultants to tell us what our common sense already knows. For example, do we need a marketing study to tell us that a student who wants to go to college in DC would value admittance to Georgetown over CUA? It’s also no secret that while AU may be a “fine school,” it falls… Read more »

Anonymous
13 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Unfortunately, I think that your assessment is spot on.

An advertisement based on strict religious identity is not likely to attract a diverse student body that just might include a potential STEM rockstar.

The Nursing School seems to be the lone exception. Although, I should add the Physics department and the Architecture School as well.

Her4e’s the key question. Is it too late or can CUA somehow escape from the corner into it has painted itself?

Anonymous
12 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

After re-reading the posts in this chain, I can’t be the only one who thinks that, with most of them, there’s some “sock-puppeting” going on.

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Here’s a timely illustration of CUA’s problem. Its hometown paper writes about a major Church development, and the article quotes an academic expert from Fordham. https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/pope-francis-latin-mass/2021/07/16/5fe7238e-e638-11eb-88c5-4fd6382c47cb_story.html

Anonymous
17 days ago

“The Busch School is On Track to Accreditation” At the risk of sounding “snarky”, I am sure that the Koch Foundation, Tim Busch, EWTN and Leonard Leo among others of their ilk are very sanguine with CUA’s Busch School of Business – unaccredited or not. Seriously, does anyone think that CUA would have made the decision to start a “business school” in this era without the support of a bunch of ultra-conservative donors who probably had never even heard of CUA? Maybe the School of Arts and Sciences, the Law School and the School of Engineering need to consider how… Read more »

Anonymous
16 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Hey, facts matter. The university established its business school by vote of the Board of Trustees in December 2012, effective January 2013. It wasn’t until 2016 that Busch, Koch, etc. made the big donations and the school was named. Based on that timeline, it’s not at all clear how the decision to create the school could have been predicated on support that came three years later.

Anonymous
16 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Hey, facts do matter and here they are.

There is no question that Garvey and Abela were working to secure promises of funding from the Koch crowd as a way to convince the BOT to agree to allow CUA to launch the business school in the first place.

(1) CUA announced the creation of a School of Business and Economics on Jan. 8, 2013

(2) Nine months later, CUA received the first Koch contribution of $1.5M
See https://communications.catholic.edu/news/2013/11/biz-school-gifts.html

(3) And three years later, CUA sold the name of its business school

Anonymous
15 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

And it remains the case that the $40mm-plus in donations didn’t come until three years after the establishment of the school.

Anonymous
15 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

You say, “[t]here is no question that Garvey and Abela were working to secure promises of funding from the Koch crowd as a way to convince the BOT to agree to allow CUA to launch the business school in the first place,” but you offer no evidence. You just confirm the previous poster’s point regarding the timeline, and you draw a conclusion based on speculation. Look, we get the point. You don’t like the politics of the people involved and any entity with which they interacted, in this case, apparently CUA and the Busch School.  You’re free to believe what you… Read more »

Anonymous
14 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Hello – Does circumstantial evidence ring a bell? Do you seriously doubt that Garvey and Abela were not working via Leonard Leo to secure donations from the Koch Foundation and Tim Busch prior to the formation of the business school? Maybe, the Koch and Busch folks just happened to see the announcement in the paper and just wandered by. Or maybe the Koch and Busch crowd were looking for a struggling institution that would be susceptible to accepting their kind of money. Let me be clear – I am a long-time supporter of CUA. But I am very sad that… Read more »

Anonymous
14 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I trust that Garvey is constantly working to woo potential donors — it’s one of his strengths as the university’s president. And perhaps he’d been wooing Koch and Busch before the school was established. But that doesn’t prove their donations had been “secure[d]. . .prior to formation of the business school” – especially not when the donations weren’t made until three years after formation. Nevertheless, and despite the lack of evidence for your speculation, what difference does it make whether the business school was established only after commitments of financial support were secured? That actually sounds like a prudent thing.

Anonymous
14 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The convention isn’t to cast aspersions on reputations based on circumstantial evidence, especially where actual evidence to the contrary exists. Notwithstanding the concerns about funding and affiliations, the school maintains its own chapel on the first floor, manifesting the intent to sustain students and faculty in their faith and to keep that faith at the heart of its teaching.  In addition to standard business courses, like accounting, the school’s curriculum addresses issues associated with the vocation of business, including: An examination of “the principles of solidarity, subsidiarity, and human dignity have been observed in the practice of commerce across the centuries.”… Read more »

Anonymous
12 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

This is an entirely cogent defense of the school. Yet it remains true that the school’s faculty includes a few folks whose CVs don’t indicate relevant training or experience in business-related disciplines and whose roles seem to be to serve as anti-abortion and/or anti-gay polemicists. It is, I submit, a legitimate question to ask whether carrying such folks on the faculty payroll makes sense in terms of resource allocation and what impact they may have on external perception of the school.

Anonymous
15 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Article in CUA Tower Newspaper re Timing of Koch Contributions is Worth Rereading “One Nation, Under the Kochs” Guest Commentary by Katie Ward, Class of 2021 Billionaire Charles Koch is not known for being a friend of the Catholic Church, so why are his recent donations changing the business school’s curriculum, and his recent publications getting him a three-day conference at the school? Koch is well-known for being a leader of the national Libertarian Party, which calls for cuts to welfare, Social Security, and Medicaid programs, to name a few, and opposes environmental regulations. This goes against the Catholic Church’s… Read more »

Anonymous
15 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

A video from the Busch School worth watching. It discusses capitalism for the common good: https://youtu.be/GeH-yy8KvyY.

Anonymous
20 days ago

“US Catholic bishops and the making of a fiasco”; 6 June 2021

Another Excellent Article by CUA Professor John Kenneth White.

See https://thehill.com/opinion/white-house/561570-us-catholic-bishops-and-the-making-of-a-fiasco

Anonymous
19 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

According to the Busch School web site, the author of this short opinion piece, who is on the school’s faculty, “researches and writes about the social science of pro-life issues. He gives presentations on both the positive impact of pro-life laws and the gains in public support for the pro-life position. He is a frequent blogger on National Review Online ‘The Corner’.” So help me understand: what contribution does that make to a business school, especially one that urgently needs to earn the respect of its aspirational peers by obtaining accreditation? Does this author have any significant experience in, or… Read more »

Last edited 19 days ago by Anonymous
Anonymous
19 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Is he not allowed to express an opinion? Or, is he restricted from expressing a contrary opinion? Or, is he restricted simply because he teaches in the business school, notwithstanding the fact that the school is part of this university? The initial post offered a view from a CUA faculty member, and the subsequent post offered another view. An exchange of ideas shouldn’t be shocking in this forum. [Edited]

Anonymous
19 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Maybe you’ve hit on the reason why, eights years after its establishment, the school remains unaccredited.

Anonymous
18 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The Busch School’s site states it is, “on track to complete the initial self evaluation (iSER) for submission by December 2021. The next phase of accreditation includes an implementation phase of the key projects and initiatives outlined in the iSER report. A final self evaluation report (SER) is submitted to AACSB for full approval. The final step in the accreditation process should be completed in 2024.” Notwithstanding the snark repeatedly cast the Busch School’s way in this forum, its students seem to enjoy meaningful internships and strong employability numbers upon graduation, all after receiving a business education that seeks to inform practical subject matter… Read more »

Anonymous
17 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Why is the school’s “initial submission” for accreditation coming eight years after the school’s creation? And why does the school’s faculty include individuals with no apparent training, experience, or record of scholarship in the school’s purported discipline — business?

Anonymous
16 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Fair questions. But where else except the Busch School could you take a course in Accounting Ethics taught by someone without a degree or license in accounting or any experience as a practicing accountant? This is the unique magic of the school.

Anonymous
14 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Here is a link to the school’s faculty: https://business.catholic.edu/faculty-and-research/faculty-profiles/index.html. Perhaps you missed it.

Anonymous
16 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

This chain started with posts about the bishops’ effort to provide further teaching on the Eucharist. Whoever responded used the posts as an occasion to criticize the Busch School, even though the school appears to provide students a path to grow in their faith, to contribute to society, and to achieve success.  At this point, these swipes at the Busch School are becoming the posting equivalent of an earworm, i.e., unedifying and somewhat annoying. As for your response, it does not address the main point of the prior post, specifically, why a colleague, instead of engaging in the substantive discussion… Read more »

Anonymous
23 days ago

In this forum CUA is sometimes characterized as a right-wing enclave governed by a Board of Trustees composed of heartless Trumpists. This video of the unveiling of the “Angels Unawares” sculpture on campus, and especially the moving remarks of Enrique Segura, vice chair of the BoT, complicate that depiction, to say the least: https://engage.catholic.edu/stories/livestream-unveiling-and-blessing-angels-unawares

Last edited 23 days ago by Anonymous
Anonymous
22 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

There is much to admire about CUA and the “Angels Unawares” sculpture is no exception.

But to use the installation of this sculpture on CUA’s campus as evidence that CUA is not a right-wing Catholic institution is at best, a non-sequiter.

Anonymous
22 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Can you say “nuance”? The post referred to a “complicate[d] depiction,” rather clearly disavowing any claim to a black-and-white conclusion. Advocating a welcoming and kind attitude toward immigrants is hardly textbook right-wing stuff.

Last edited 22 days ago by Anonymous
Anonymous
21 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Sorry – but given your incessant cheerleading for everything that CUA’s current administration does, I missed the “nuance” of your latest post…..

Anonymous
20 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Basis of Characterization

Remember when Leonard Leo/CUA Trustee lauded former Attorney General Barr as a “truly Catholic public servant,” even as the presentation was scheduled between two death sentences.

Watch at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AttN2h7Gyxc

Anonymous
19 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

You use of the phrase, “heartless Trumpists.” Do you allow for the possibility that there exist Trumpists that are not heartless? Over 74 million citizens voted for the former President, and they may have done so for different reasons, some of which likely would not justify anyone exercising sanctimonious judgment over the status of their hearts.

Anonymous
19 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I allow for that possibility, but I was referring to sentiments expressed by so many of the posts in this forum regarding the university and its Board of Trustees.

Anonymous
24 days ago

What do the numbers to date indicate regarding Fall freshman enrollment?

Anonymous
25 days ago

For those who still fail to appreciate Pres. Garvey’s emphasis on building up the institutional advancement operation: https://www.cnn.com/2021/06/30/media/david-geffen-yale-drama-school/index.html

Anonymous
25 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Meanwhile, six years into a seven-year capital campaign, CUA’s Rome School is less than a third of the way to meeting a far lesser goal amount. https://engage.catholic.edu/campaign/benjamin-t-rome-school-music-drama-and-art

A Disillusioned Former Donor
25 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Dear Anonymous – I am so weary of your incessant cheerleading about why the CUA Community should be so happy about the success of CUA’s advancement campaign. Since you seem to be part of CUA’s senior administration, please provide the CUA Family with the specific things that CUA is doing to combat its existential threats Please tell us how CUA has (or will) used the funds from its capital campaign to address its existential threats, including: (1) A steadily decreasing undergraduate and graduate enrollment; (2) An underwhelming portfolio of sponsored research; (3) An underpaid faculty that feels that it is… Read more »

Anonymous
25 days ago

I’ll try again. (1)more money allows more scholarships and stipends to attract undergrad and grad students, and more money pays for better facilities that enhance the attractiveness of the school to prospective students; (2) more money will allow the hiring of faculty capable of attracting research grants; (3) more money will allow better pay for faculty, even those who can’t seem to attract external funding; (4) more scholarship money and nicer facilities will attract better-credentialed students, an important component of rankings; (5) this category is unlikely to be affected by the unprecedented fundraising under Pres. Garvey. I suggest you save… Read more »

Anonymous
24 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

It’s obviously not a bad thing for a university to be successful at fundraising.

And I get what the money COULD BE used for

What is bad is when the university doesn’t spend the money that it has raised to solve its existential problems.

What is it that you don’t get about this simple fact?

Anonymous
22 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Fundraising for scholarships is really tough. The amount of money required to “endow” the equivalent of even a single meaningful scholarship is immense, and then that endowment has to be constantly shepherded and fed to ensure that the yield outpaces inflation. That’s not a CUA issue, but rather a university-funding issue. Same problem with “endowing” professorships.

Anonymous
21 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Very true. That’s why the successful universities are those that made aggressive development a priority from their very beginning and kept it up decade after decade after decade. Georgetown was prosperous and prestigious long before there was televised basketball. CUA had neglected this crucial task until Garvey came along, and you don’t catch up overnight.

Last edited 21 days ago by Anonymous
Anonymous
24 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Is CUA claiming success from Yale’s development efforts now? That is a great strategy to goose the numbers.

Anonymous
24 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Of course not. The point is that major philanthropy is essential for a university to excel. Garvey is the first CUA president to act on this imperative in an aggressive and professional manner.

Anonymous
23 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

i appreciate your response, but don’t think that person was serious. There seems to be a lot of trolling going on here (not you).

Anonymous
26 days ago

A Reminder That Universities Must Carefully Vet Their Candidates for Dean; 1 July 2021

https://fortune.com/2021/06/30/bill-cosby-conviction-overturned-phylicia-rashad-celebration-tweet-howard-university-dean/

Anonymous
25 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

It’s a little hard to believe that Howard somehow was unaware of Rashad’s feelings about the Cosby matter before it hired her.  She hasn’t hidden them, having expressed them in interviews for several years.  

Anonymous
25 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

If your suspicions are accurate, it certainly won’t help Howard’s national ranking.

Anonymous
24 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

What ranking system includes a metric for a particular dean’s opinion on the outcome of a particular legal dispute?

Anonymous
23 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Good point.

Anonymous
23 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Especially when that opinion (aside from the personal support for the individual) is consistent with due process under the Constitution?

Anonymous
25 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Who would question that universities need to “carefully vet” potential senior hires?

Anonymous
27 days ago

President Biden nominates CUA Law School Graduate to the Superior Court of the District of Columbia Judge Sean C. Staples is a Magistrate Judge assigned to the Criminal and Domestic Violence Divisions on the Superior Court of the District of Columbia. Before his appointment to the bench, Judge Staples was an attorney with the Children’s Law Center from 2006 to 2013, last serving as the Guardian ad Litem Project Director. From 2000 to 2006, Judge Staples was a clinical professor in the Criminal Division of the D.C. Law Students in Court Program, supervising law students in the representation of adults and… Read more »

Anonymous
28 days ago

According to the CUA website, “The University continues to be the flagship Catholic educational institution in the United States and to maintain its unique status as the bishops’ university.” (https://www.catholic.edu/about-us/at-a-glance/history.html)

The hubris of referring to CUA as, “The flagship Catholic educational institution in the United States” is embarrassing at best. 

But to brag about, “Its unique status as the bishops’ university” may be true but it is unfortunate at best.

With regard to the second point, I recommend reading this recent editorial, “Bishops may be the leaders of our church, but it’s not their church.”

https://www.ncronline.org/news/editorial-dont-put-your-faith-bishops-conference

Anonymous
28 days ago

Another excellent article on the history of the Catholic Church’s teaching on abortion
 
See The history of Catholic teaching on abortion isn’t as clear cut as you think”

https://theoutline.com/post/8536/catholic-history-abortion-brigid

Anonymous
1 month ago

Hey Delta Variant:

Come on over to CUA!  Vaccines not required, no one really has to wear those pesky masks, and social distancing and classroom capacity limits stopped here a month ago. The leadership is delusional and don’t believe you’re real. Expect a lot of unvaccinated kids breathing on each other. CUA has become downright hospitable to dangerous, spreading variants like you. It’s a perfect set-up. Meet me in the Busch school. I can’t wait to hook up.

Love,
COVID-19.  

Anonymous
29 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Thanks for the invite, Covee. Actually CUA was my safety school, and you know how I love irony! Best, DV.

Last edited 29 days ago by Anonymous
Anonymous
1 month ago

In 2020, 52 percent of Catholic voters backed Biden.

Question for US Bishops – Are they, too, unworthy to receive Holy Communion?

A very thoughtful article by John Kenneth White, CUA Professor of politics.

https://thehill.com/opinion/white-house/559510-us-catholic-bishops-join-the-culture-wars?rnd=1624320150&rl=1

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Measured by deserters, the American Catholic Church has been losing the culture wars for decades. Its self-destruction continues.

Anonymous
29 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

A compelling argument from the kind of thinker CUA can only wish it could call its own. https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/27/opinion/biden-bishops-communion-abortion.html?action=click&module=Opinion&pgtype=Homepage

Anonymous
1 month ago

An update worth reading – “Some Catholic colleges forgo vaccine mandates, worrying public health experts; 23 June 2021

https://www.ncronline.org/news/coronavirus/some-catholic-colleges-forgo-vaccine-mandates-worrying-public-health-experts

Anonymous
1 month ago

CUA recently diluted the bishops’ membership in its Board of Trustees. I recently read that the CUA BOT was increased to 48 by adding six new lay members. See https://communications.catholic.edu/news/2021/06/board-appoints-six-new-trustees.html Color me cynical, but I don’t doubt that Garvey saw this a way to ensure that he gets another term as CUA president.  On the other hand, a report about the bishops’ plan to politicize the sacrament of Holy Communion makes me embarrassed about CUA boasting that it is “the bishops’ university”. See https://www.msnbc.com/rachel-maddow-show/catholic-bishops-take-provocative-shot-biden-s-direction-n1271884 So, diluting the bishops’ membership in the BOT has to be a good thing in the long… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The comment above so misses the mark. First of all, what evidence is there that Garvey enjoys less support among the clerical members of the BofT than among the lay members? If that were the case, why would the clerics permit the addition of “pro-Garvey” trustees, as they did when they approved the restructuring of the board? It makes no sense. Second, the restructuring of the board to include more lay members is one of Garvey’s greatest achievements. It recognizes what successful Catholic universities have known for generations — that financial resources are the single most important factor for achieving… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

OK, Garvey has successfully restructured (i.e. diluted) the BOT. And you consider that to be his signature achievement – a rather low bar, don’t you think? Look, to be declared that it is a successful Catholic university, CUA must quantitatively demonstrate that it has: (1) A robust undergraduate and graduate enrollment; (2) A significant portfolio of sponsored research; (3) A vibrant faculty that feels that it is appreciated; (4) An acceptable national ranking; and (5) Concern for all people, including the LGBT community and liberal Catholics So far, Garvey is batting a woeful one for six (0.167). And this in… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Your use of the word “diluted” makes no sense. “Diluted” from what? See my comments above regarding why your original “pro-Garvey trustees” post is illogical. The university certainly suffers from the deficiencies you list, but you ignore the fact that this same list applied BEFORE Garvey came to the presidency. CUA had lost its place in the AAU, was overshadowed by a bunch of better-known Catholic universities, perennially struggled to make ends meet financially, and employed a faculty unable to attract much more than nominal external funding. And it lacked a professional, institutional advancement infrastructure necessary to try to change… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Anonymous
Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

It’s worth remembering that there are precedents for less-than-stellar schools turning themselves around to become strong, nationally respected institutions. In DC, there’s the example of GW. Even more prominently, NYU and Boston University come to mind. The rebirth of all three of those schools had two things in common: strong presidents who were willing to disturb the status quo, and large amounts of money raised by those presidents. Granted, CUA has a unique problem: It has positioned itself as “The” Catholic university of America but it never has been and never can be that. Not in a country with Notre… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Anonymous
Anonymous
1 month ago

FYI – “CUA Graduate’s Family Gifts $3M to Business School to Establish Endowed Chair in Finance and Entrepreneurship.”; 20 June 2021

https://www.bizjournals.com/washington/news/2021/06/20/howard-university-pishevar-grant.html

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

To be clear, this money went to Howard U, not CUA.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I guess CUA’s Development Office won’t be able to include this donation…..:)

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I wouldn’t concede that without knowing the criteria they’re using to count. (Joke.)

Anonymous
1 month ago

CUA’s website proudly states that the Catholic University of America is unique as the US national university of the Catholic Church and it is the only higher education institution in the US founded by the US bishops.

And CUA’s BOT is filled with U.S. bishops and cardinals.

The appended news article has to make President Garvey proud.

The Vatican – not so much.

See https://www.ncronline.org/news/people/defiance-vatican-us-bishops-vote-advance-communion-document

By the way, if former President Trump were Catholic, he would have had no problem receiving the sacrament of Holy Communion.

How many ways can CUA hide its “hypocrisy”?

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

[edited] In all your speculation, however, you failed to identify the key point: this controversy was sparked by Mr. Biden.  After embracing an aggressive pro-abortion agenda, both he and his press secretary portrayed the president as a devout Catholic.  His obstinacy (along with that of others in the public square identifying as Catholics) in showcasing as legitimate a position antithetical to such a core Church teach has given rise to significant confusion among the faithful which needs to be addressed by the bishops in their teaching capacity.  How the matter will be resolved remains to be seen. Your comment manifests no desire to… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

There’s a term for what the Church is doing. It’s called eating your own.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Speculate?

Based on your response, I have to speculate that you are in favor of politicizing the Holy Eucharist and if that is the case, I am in total disagreement with you.

Excuse me – did I miss the times when the US Bishops commented on the atrocious, immoral behavior of President Biden’s predecessor?

Excuse me – does Pope Francis agree with the US Bishops’ plan to discuss denying President Biden from receiving the Holy Eucharist?

Thank God that the Chancellor of The Catholic University of America doesn’t agree with this misguided plan either.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

You are in total disagreement with what you speculated that I said. I said that, “this controversy was sparked by Mr. Biden.  After embracing an aggressive pro-abortion agenda, both he and his press secretary portrayed the president as a devout Catholic.  His obstinacy … in showcasing as legitimate a position antithetical to such a core Church teach[ing] has given rise to significant confusion among the faithful which needs to be addressed by the bishops in their teaching capacity.”   I did not say I was in favor of politicizing the Holy Eucharist.  I said, “How the matter will be resolved remains to be seen.”  I… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago

More re “The Catholic University of America opens a new office and education space in Alexandria”; 17 June 2021

https://www.bollyinside.com/news/the-catholic-university-of-america-opens-a-new-office-and-education-space-in-alexandria

Anonymous
1 month ago

Dear Colleagues – I suggest that you read the description that was published on the CUA website in March 2021, entitled, “CatholicU-Tucson Program Takes Root” I think that it summarizes the situation very well: • It is a partnership between CUA and the Tucson business community; • It is cost-effective as the CUA courses are taught on-line; • It promotes Catholic values; and it • Provides some CUA name recognition in the western United States • Improved name-recognition may help enrollment in the Brookland campus. As a frequent critic of many things that CUA’s administration has been doing (or not… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

You say you are “waiting to learn what CUA’s administration is going to do” to remedy four issues. I wonder whether you’ve read the university’s Strategic Plan or the objectives of its current capital campaign, which has raised close to $400mm for purposes bearing on all four concerns. Or whether you’re aware of the Board of Trustees’ recent commitment of $5mm toward a comprehensive marketing campaign, as described here: https://president.catholic.edu/announcing-the-division-of-university-communications.html With so much information available about what the administration “is going to do ” — and is already doing — to address these issues, one has to question whether claimed… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Dear Colleague – I just read your response to a poster’s concerns about the four existential threats that CUA must deal with. First of all, I did not find the previous poster to have demonstrated either “feigned or willful ignorance”. Quite the contrary. I thought that the previous poster simply raised the key concerns that many of us have raised before. So, your questioning the poster’s intelligence or motives was neither helpful nor appropriate – and certainly not collegial. Your response to the poster’s concerns was to cite some rearranging of the deck chairs in the enrollment office. I’m all… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Rhetorical tip: When you have to make stuff up to respond to an argument, your response is probably a bit weak. Case in point: nowhere in my post did I “question[] the poster’s intelligence.” The verb “feign” and the adjective “willful” refer to intentional conduct, but they don’t impugn intelligence. As for the 2016 Strategic Plan, you suggest there has been a failure to revise it, but you don’t identify any particular revisions that need to be made. If you can, please do. If you really believe that raising funds to renovate Maloney Hall, building a new dining facility, creating… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Anonymous
Anonymous
1 month ago

What is this community’s view regarding CUA’s new programs in Tuscon, Arizona and Alexandria, Va.? I don’t understand Alexandria, as competition from cheaper and better-regarded schools would seem to be formidable. I recall reading that the university received a donation to fund the Tuscon experiment, but to what end? Who’s doing the teaching in Tuscon? Has anyone seen business models that project net revenues from either of these ventures?

Last edited 1 month ago by Anonymous
Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Both of these ventures seem reasonable to me and have some strategic value.

The Tuscon initiative is an example of spreading the Catholic faith in an area of need.

Subleasing some space in Alexandria provides a convenient way for full-time workers to take graduate courses without coming to Brookland.

CUA in Tucson https://www.catholic.edu/tucson/about-us/index.html

CUA in Alexandria https://www.catholic.edu/alexandria/index.html

Unfortunately, I have never seen net revenue business models for anything that CUA does.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Isn’t “spreading the Catholic faith” in a heavily Hispanic population a little like carrying coals to Newcastle?

Last edited 1 month ago by Anonymous
Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Your question implies a number of assumptions about Hispanics as a group that may or may not hold true. In an era of pathological wokeness, however, on an academic website, rather than referencing immutable personal characteristics (not intending to question the legitimate role of cultures or origins), the discussion would be enhanced by speaking in terms of hard demographic data.  As a starting point (and only a starting point (it is not exhaustive) regarding some faith practices), it might be helpful to look here:  https://www.pewforum.org/religious-landscape-study/religious-tradition/catholic/.  From that standpoint, the level of identified or baptized Catholics might not be dispositive if one considers the… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

From the very source you link to:

“According to the Pew Hispanic survey, 83% of Hispanics claim a religious affiliation, a share slightly higher than that seen among the general public (80%).

“Among Latinos, most are Catholic—more than three-in-five (62%) say this is their religious affiliation. Meanwhile, one-in-five (19%) Latino adults say they are Protestant, and 14% say they are unaffiliated with any religion.”

As I said, coals to Newcastle if the objective is “spreading the faith.”

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

From the very source linked to: 52% identify as Hispanic. 59% of Catholic adults (not by race) seldom/never attend a prayer group; 39% of Catholic adults (not by race) seldom/never meditate; 51% of Catholic adults (not by race) rely on themselves to determine right and wrong (raising questions of informed decision making); 55% of Catholic adults (not by race) feel that right and wrong depend on the situation; and only 29% of Catholic adults (not by race) read scripture at least once a week, with 45% seldom/never reading scripture.  You are the one who injected race into the discussion here.  From… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Tuscon appears to be mostly online business courses offered by a non-accredited business school. Trump University redux? As for Alexandria, why would a student choose CUA over a less expensive nearby public option?

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Here’s a link discussing the program: https://www.catholic.edu/tucson/index.html. It doesn’t look like a Trump University redux.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The motive underlying your comment is unclear.  You point out that the school is unaccredited, but the school is young, and that issue is in the process of being resolved.  You ask why a student would choose CUA over a less expensive, nearby public option, but that question is not limited to the business school. In any case, it is strange coming from a faculty member at a Catholic university, as it should be understood that instruction interwoven with Catholic teaching is the differentiator.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The school is not really “young”; it was established eight years ago, according to the “Dean’s Message” on its web site: https://business.catholic.edu/about-us/welcome/index.html Eight years, and yet it still hasn’t completed even the “initial” submission for the accreditation process. (The school’s web site states: “The Busch School is on track to complete the initial self evaluation (iSER) for submission by December 2021.”). So I don’t think “youth” explains it. I agree that CUA’s competitiveness is not limited to the business school, but because it appears the Alexandria operation is offering mostly or exclusively business school courses, that’s why the competitiveness of… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

One wonders whether there is a “hinkiness” to the absence of certification, at least for those approaching education as consumers in a marketplace.  At the same time, however, the school appears to be performing well, notwithstanding its pending certification effort.  Its 2020 Graduate Outcomes data is here: https://business.catholic.edu/_media/2020-graduate-outcomes.pdf.  Although not an argument to ignore expediting certification, it appears to demonstrate strong outcomes for graduates. Regarding “draw,” arguably, the term is relative, based on what the school wants to showcase in alignment with its identity.  Certainly, the school could improve its draw by fielding a D1 basketball or football team, but that draw could come with… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

We don’t have to wonder what happens when a school “over-weights” — just look around.

Anonymous
1 month ago

CUA claims to be a “national research university”.

Recently, the CUA provost proudly announced that In total, the university was awarded over $113 million in grant money.

You might ask how does CUA stack up against the 100 most highly endowed universities as regards to its commitment to research and its faculty compensation?

See for yourself.

https://thebestschools.org/features/richest-universities-endowments-generosity-research/

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

It’s unfortunate that CUA doesn’t have more faculty with the skills and professional standing needed to secure greater external funding than the amount advertised by the Provost. Perhaps if, starting decades ago, the university had pursued the sort of institutional advancement initiated by Pres. Garvey in the past few years, it would have accumulated the kind of wealth and faculties enjoyed by the universities on the linked list. But the administration has taken concrete steps to try to turn things around — with the restructuring of the Board of Trustees, the nearly completed capital campaign, and creation of a serious… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Your unabashed cheerleading for Garvey’s “enlightened growth strategy” and belief that it will solve all of CUA’s problems, seems to have no bounds. With regard to CUA’s tepid success in demonstrating that it is a national research university, please inform us as to how much of CUA’s accumulated wealth due to the advancement office and the restructuring of the BOT has been invested in the expansion of its: One-man Office of Technology Transfer; Acquiring state-of-the art technical laboratories and associated equipment; Hiring laboratory and IT support to manage and maintain these facilities; Reducing faculty teaching loads to provide time for… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

One of CUA’s problems is that it appears to have faculty members who don’t understand such basic concepts as the “strawman argument” — a false claim that an individual is advocating a particular proposition, made because that proposition is easier to rebut than the argument that the individual is actually advocating. Nowhere have I said that Garvey’s strategies “will solve all of CUA’s problems.” In fact, I have said repeatedly that his efforts to reverse generations of poor management may come too late to halt the university’s decline. I do agree with you that faculty recruitment is a necessity.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I posted the above and the last sentence should read, “Clearly, we need to clone the leaders of the physics department and the school of nursing who have achieved success in spite of the handicaps of being art of CUA.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Regarding the statement that “CUA claims to be a ‘national research university,’ U.S News states that, “we group schools by academic mission into 10 distinct rankings,” and it identifies National Universities as schools that “offer a full range of undergraduate majors, plus master’s and doctoral programs, and emphasize faculty research or award professional practice doctorates.“

https://www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/articles/how-us-news-calculated-the-rankings

Anonymous
1 month ago

CUA does not require Covid-19 vaccinations and now transitions from COVID Protocols; 10 June 2021

http://cuatower.com/2021/06/cua-transition-from-covid-protocols/

CUA’s leadership in this area continues to give me grave concerns.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

CUA’s motto – “What, me worry?”

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Notice the complete absence of masks in these photos, including the group shot. https://communications.catholic.edu/news/2021/06/alexandria-blessing.html

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Are they vaccinated? No offense to the individuals, but based on the apparent age of the crowd, it is likely they are. It was a June meeting. A month earlier, the CDC relaxed its mask guidance, announcing that fully vaccinated people would be safe maskless in most indoor settings.

Anonymous
1 month ago

Garvey’s plan to expand the BOT continues with the addition of at least several new members with high-level careers or connections to business/finance: https://communications.catholic.edu/news/2021/06/board-appoints-six-new-trustees.html
Remember how for decade after decade the board consisted mainly of clerics whose idea of fundraising was an annual church collection? The restructuring of the BOT will be one of Garvey’s proudest legacies. CUA’s board is starting to look like a university’s.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

“Proudest legacy”???? Are you serious?

This appears to be nothing more than loading up the BOT to ensure that Garvey will be approved for yet another term as CUA president.

In my opinion, giving Garvey three terms will be one of the BOT’s most unfortunate legacies.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

It’s an enormously positive, transformative achievement to restructure the board so that lay members with the means to generate significant philanthropy play a far larger role than in the past. Garvey has raised more money than probably his last six or more predecessors combined. Don’t you understand that wealth, more than any other single factor, is what distinguishes mediocre colleges from successful ones?

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Liberty University is very wealthy.

2019 Survey ranks Liberty University 68th in the U.S. in endowment with $1.7B

Ergo, by your reasoning they must be very successful.

Oh, wait. Their latest national ranking has them ranked 298 to 389.

Must be it takes more than wealth to be successful.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Of course it take s more. But you still can’t do it without the money. Name a top-ranked university that isn’t wealthy.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The money often comes with strings attached and/an agenda. Often it’s not money to hire the best. Helps explain the differential between Liberty University’s money and it’s academic standing. It was far better when the bishops played an important role on the board. They knew the university’s history and deeply cared about graduate education.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The bishops’ stewardship led to a university forced to leave the AAU for failure to keep up with membership standards and overshadowed by numerous Catholic universities far more successful in terms of prestige, resources, and prospective student demand. Can anyone seriously deny that?

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

All top-rated universities are wealthy.

But not all wealthy universities are top-rated.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I am really tired of reading the disparaging comments about past university presidents.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

But can you specify any of those comments that are factually inaccurate?

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I (different person) can specify that the exchanges throughout are not emblematic of a professional faculty. Indeed, there is a heavy dose of whining and sniping without much more. Perhaps some of the contributors should be considering other lines of work. They should be careful, though. In the words of Dr. Raymond Stantz, “I’ve worked in the private sector. They expect results.” (Yes, I quoted Ghostbusters.)