Discussion

Jump into a conversation or start a new one. Faculty are invited to share their concerns or insights on a wide-range of topics relevant to the university. Contributors should show each other mutual respect.

Subscribe
Notify of
484 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Adeodatus
2 days ago

Dear Colleagues, As members of the Faculty Assembly, and following the charism expressed by St. John Henry Newman, we are asked “to respect, to consult, and to aid each other. Thus is created a pure and clear atmosphere of thought which the student also breathes.” With that charism in mind, I am extremely disheartened, discouraged, and insulted by the tweets from a colleague in the School of Theology and Religious Studies, who deemed it acceptable to tweet “Ding Dong, the Witch is Dead” upon the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. This tweet started a series of misogynistic… Read more »

Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Adeodatus

Apologies are as cheap as confessions. An apology won’t change the fundamentally rotten character of a person who would express such ugliness.

Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Adeodatus

Because sunlight is a strong disinfectant, I ask that the referenced tweeter be identified.

Adeodatus
1 day ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I believe the rules and decorum of the Faculty Assembly prevent us from naming people directly, but from his own website in TRS, this person “serves as a member of the Editorial Board of The Catholic University of America Press and co-edits the Sacra Doctrina series. He serves as an Associate Editor for the English Edition of the international Thomistic journal of theology, Nova et Vetera. He serves as Chairman of the Academy of Catholic Theology, and has the honor of serving as a Fellow of the Institute for Human Ecology at Catholic University.” If nothing else, I think this… Read more »

Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Adeodatus

Yes, this allows one to peck at a guess about the author’s identity.

Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Adeodatus

A screen shot of the tweet, and confirmation of the author (who apparently deleted it after being called out), can be found on Shannon Last’s twitter thread on Sept. 18: @shannon_last · Sep 18 So there’s enough evidence to hold him accountable.

Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I agree, totally. The “tweeter” is an insult to all that CUA claims to be good.

Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Adeodatus

What kind of institution harbors such foulness? If Garvey does not impose the same or greater sanction on the tweet’s author as was visited on the NCSSS dean, it will reveal a lot about Garvey’s character and that of the university as a whole.

Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Anonymous

To answer your question: One that values religious zealotry over intelligence. Putting aside the moral calibre of the tweeter’s action, it was a monumentally stupid thing to do. Parents, this is who’s teaching your kids.

Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Adeodatus

In a tweet last week, Garvey described Ginsburg as a “formidable Supreme Court justice,” choosing an adjective that so often precedes “opponent.”

Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Adeodatus

Garvey won’t act unless and until somebody leaks a screen shot of the tweet (I assume it’s been removed by now) to the press.

Adeodatus
1 day ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Always remember, nothing is hidden on the Internet, even if you delete the information.

Ding Dong the Witch is Dead - Copy.png
Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Adeodatus

This needs to be brought to the attention of the WaPo religion reporter, whoever that is.

Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Adeodatus

Which underscores the point that, morality aside, anybody who posts something like this just isn’t very bright. And in the context of a university faculty, that should matter.

Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Adeodatus

Is the guy who tweeted this filth tenured?

Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Adeodatus

https://mobile.twitter.com/ScottEricAlt/status/1307701547694993408

Alt is not the tweeter himself but there is a thread about tweet

Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Adeodatus

This is sickening, but I am not surprised. CUA is extremely corrupted, and it operates like a medieval-age church.

Anonymous
19 hours ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The medieval-age church was financially sounder.

Anonymous
19 hours ago
Reply to  Adeodatus

Has there been even a hint of concern from the university administration about this tweet and its origin in a member of the faculty?

Anonymous
2 days ago

Some food for thought – “The Future of the Academic Work Force”; 09.17.20

https://community.chronicle.com/news/2410-the-future-of-the-academic-work-force

Anonymous
3 days ago

FYI – Arbitrator Sides with U of Akron on Faculty Layoffs; 21 Sep 2020

https://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2020/09/21/arbitrator-sides-u-akron-faculty-layoffs

Anonymous
3 days ago

FYI – Lack of uniformity in Covid-19 dashboards undermines their value; 18 Sep 2020

A Tool to Inform Too Often Confuses

https://www.chronicle.com/article/a-tool-to-inform-too-often-confuses?cid=gen_sign_in

Anonymous
5 days ago

All –

This website rates the Covid Dashboards of some 155 universities.

See https://www.ratecoviddashboard.com/ratings

Unfortunately, CUA was not included in the review.

But at least CUA has a Covid Dashboard. 

Georgetown and Howard don’t even have a Covid dashboard.

Anonymous
7 days ago

CUA’s Business School was created almost 8 years ago.

Does anyone know if CUA has made any progress on obtaining accreditation for the Busch School of Business?

See “Economics Department to Leave Busch School of Business in the Fall of 2018”

http://cuatower.com/2018/02/economics-department-to-leave-busch-school-of-business-next-fall/

Anonymous
7 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

It appears to be an undergraduate accountancy school more than anything else. They’ve filled several precious faculty slots with folks engaged in right-leaning “social science” work that is as vague as it is irrelevant to business training. They constructed the curriculum to echo the religious/political sentiments of Mr. Busch and some of his wealthy friends, not to be a serious business school. That said, the accounting major draws students who want to be in DC and can’t get into better schools, and it seems to get at least some of them entry-level jobs. The school’s web site is pathetic.

Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Sadly, your description of the Busch Business School seems to be spot-on. It will likely take more than a beautiful Maloney Hall to enable the business school to be accredited.

The good news is that most, if not all, of CUA’s other schools are very reputable. The Conway School of Nursing is a prime example.

If only CUA’s Development Office could find a few more “Conway’s”.

Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

They really should concentrate resources in three schools – Architecture, Law, and Rome Music/Drama/Art. Architecture enjoys a lack of strong competition in D.C., which could be exploited. Law is underrated and suffers from the university siphoning too much money out of it; Garvey should recognize that a more prestigious law school would shed a halo effect on the university as a whole. Music/drama has a history of producing some very successful alums, although the university’s rigid Catholic orthodoxy alienates many of the most famous among them; a little practicality, like the Jesuits practice, would go a long way here.

Anonymous
3 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Progress on obtaining accreditation would require that the faculty in each discipline in the school be active researchers. The gap in research productivity was one of the reasons that the economists left the school. As I understand it, the economists are delighted to be back in Arts and Sciences where peer-reviewed research is respected. The upshot is that the School of Business has no hope of obtaining accreditation. Things are so bad that a senior faculty in the School has claimed that accreditation is unimportant even though all of Business Schools that Busch School competes with are accredited by AACSB.… Read more »

Anonymous
3 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Here, according to the school’s own web site, is “the latest research done by our Social Research professors”: https://business.catholic.edu/social-research/featured-research/index.html

Anonymous
3 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Embarrassing would be an understatement.

Anonymous
8 days ago

In case you were wondering about the effectiveness of CUA’s financial management, note that CUA does not have a waiting list of freshman because CUA accepts 85% of its applicants. And then it provides most of them with generous discounts on tuition. This lack of selectivity surely affects CUA’s continuing decline in national reviews.

Anonymous
8 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Certainly CUA’s lack of selectivity is a major factor in its embarrassing ranking, but you make it sound as if this is a choice by the school. Put simply, too few people perceive it as a particularly good and desirable school, and so it can’t be choosy about whom it admits. But I’m not sure this reflects poor financial management. On the contrary, CUA’s essentially “open admissions” policy is a necessity from a financial standpoint. Where poor financial management does come in, I submit, are the decades of neglect of fundraising, which is something Garvey has tried to address with… Read more »

Anonymous
8 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

It might be wise to temper your hopes that CUA’s Development Office and a “restructured” Board of Trustees will bail CUAout of its current financial woes.

See “Survey forecasts ‘dramatic decline’ in fundraising from pandemic”

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2020/06/08/survey-forecasts-%E2%80%98dramatic-decline%E2%80%99-fundraising-pandemic

Anonymous
8 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

That doesn’t argue for not trying to raise every dollar you can.

Anonymous
7 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

In fact, when donor dollars are scarce, that’s exactly when you most need a robust advancement operation.

Anonymous
8 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

A key problem with the selectivity stat is that while peers are growing their application pool considerably. CUA’s applications have been stagnant or only incremental. Growing this pool by 20-30% would have a huge affect on enrollment. Admissions needs to kick it in gear. Marketing materials for prospective students screams “old”, “stodgy” and “low budget.” Even the paper it printed on has faded images. Too much text, not enough eye candy. Everything needs to be updated and rethought for a millennial Tik-Tok, modern audience.

Anonymous
8 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Agree that CUA marketing/communications need a major upgrade. Particularly embarrassing is the multitude of typographical errors throughout the university’s web pages. Here’s just one of scores of examples I could provide: A recent letter from Pres. Garvey discussing, among other things, the financial impact of the pandemic on the university. Skim down until you get to the bold-faced subhead: “Furlougs and Salary Reductions”. See: https://president.catholic.edu/communications/letters/university-operational-and-financial-decisions.html Furloughs, get it? I mean, this is an official communication by the top officer of the university, and his staff can’t manage to proof-read it, or at least use a spellcheck app. As I said,… Read more »

Anonymous
8 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Unfortunately, declining prestige and consumer demand form a feedback loop. As the school’s reputation slides, so does its appeal to prospective students. That’s why schools invoke the cliche “transformative” to describe an extraordinary gift. When you reach a low enough point on the prestige scale, incremental improvement gets you nowhere; it’s like tires spinning in mud.

Anonymous
9 days ago

A Recent Description of Corporate Culture And Shared Governance at GWU

Warning – this is not a happy story. Hopefully CUA will not follow GWU’s example.

https://www.aaup.org/article/how-not-corporatize-university#.X2D6_tZ7kZ8

Anonymous
9 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

GW is a university with a $1.7 billion endowment and a waiting list of freshmen applicants. Who’d you rather work for?

Anonymous
10 days ago

Yet another plunge in the US News rankings for CUA (down to 143), which isn’t even close to the top among Catholic institutions. See: https://news.stthomas.edu/st-thomas-ranks-among-top-20-national-catholic-universities-in-u-s-news-best-colleges-report/
At what point do you ask, what’s the point?

Former CUA Donor
10 days ago

CUA Tied with George Mason University in 2021 US News College Rankings

Given CUA’s costs, this ranking probably won’t help CUA recruit Virginia student residents.

Moreover, CUA’s ranking in the overall DC-MD-VA-DE area is quite underwhelming.

Unfortunately, CUA’s low ranking existed long before the COVID-19 pandemic and CUA’s strategy to improve its ranking has never been made clear to me as an alum and donor.

https://patch.com/virginia/arlington-va/s/h8qhk/best-colleges-in-virginia-dc-u-s-news-rankings-for-2021?utm_source=nearby-news&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=alert

Anonymous
12 days ago

I continue to worry about the impending pay cuts, which give every indication of not lasting merely for a year and of going much deeper than many people have prognosticated.

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

What’s your evidence — i.e., the “every indication” — on which you rely?

Anonymous
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I would concur with your assessment. The poor frosh enrollment this year will have a carryover effect for the next 4 years. I fear we will have another round of “Academic Renewal” sooner rather than later. I have little confidence the leadership is equipped to deal with the crisis.

Anonymous
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

This. Plus the fact that this year’s discussions about recruitment are already lamenting the lack of future campus visits. We are being prepared for another smaller freshman class. Plus the numbers involved in the current cuts. The university has already closed some budget gaps this year by taking one time actions. Unless it has some other one time items available for next fiscal year, we need to cut operating expenses to make budget. I think the retirement match is gone for good, but they are going to need more. The cuts are a given. To me, what we need to… Read more »

Anonymous
12 days ago

CUA’s COVID-19 Testing Data – As of 8 Sep 2020 According to its own website, CUA has completed just 44 COVID-19 tests between 24 Aug 2020 and 8 Sep 2020 https://communications.catholic.edu/coronavirus/testing/index.html Am I the only one who thinks that this number is woefully small; especially compared to the numbers published by other universities? Is this inadequate testing program due to financial limitations?  Or, even worse, is it a strategy to limit COVID-19 testing so as to keep the Administration’s head in the sand regarding the actual number of infections? In either case, the CUA faculty, staff and students deserve to… Read more »

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Problems that I see with this: CUA is posting data only twice per week. This is surely not the result of a shortage of people who can edit the page, nor is it impossible to fit it onto the graph. CUA is only graphing tests given on campus. Faculty and staff cannot be tested on campus. Off campus students may choose to be tested elsewhere and probably will in many cases. Their outcomes, when the school knows them, are in the written prose under the graph, but not in the graph itself. The casual reader will probably miss it. CUA… Read more »

Last edited 11 days ago by Anonymous
Anonymous
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Indeed, perfection is elusive.

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Seems to me the university has been pretty transparent about its testing criteria: “The University has focused testing efforts on symptomatic students and those who have come into direct contact with positive cases of COVID-19. Direct contacts are those individuals who have come into direct contact (at least 15 minutes of contact within 6 feet) of a positive or presumed positive case.” SOURCE: https://communications.catholic.edu/coronavirus/testing/index.html If someone has a FACTUAL basis for asserting that these limitations reflect “inadequate testing,” I’d welcome seeing it. If, on the other hand, the assertion is just another example of ill-informed, unsubstantiated CUA-bashing, maybe the moderators… Read more »

Anonymous
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The MAJOR flaw in this logic and CUA’s strategy that I can see is that it is well-known that there are asymptomatic COVID cases. These individuals can spread the the virus to others unknowingly. Hence a testing strategy based ONLY on testing symptomatic students is flawed and akin to playing whack-a-mole. It is an inherently reactive approach and the timelag allows for virus spread unchecked.

Anonymous
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Anonymous, are you on the faculty of CUA’s medical school or its school of public health? In any event, your reference to “a testing strategy based ONLY on testing symptomatic students” is a straw man: If you read CUA’s testing criteria, quoted in the post above and accessible via the posted link, you will see it is not limited to symptomatic students.

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

In fact, it appears that CUA’s testing criteria are consistent with the CDC’s most recent guidance to institutions of higher education (“IHEs”). See the section entitled “When testing might be needed” in the following CDC web page: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/colleges-universities/ihe-testing.html
So, again, what is the factual basis for labeling CUA’s testing as “inadequate”?

Anonymous
6 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

And here is the problem with current CDC guidelines… it is not based on good science and not thoroughly peer reviewed. It has been politicized and now being written by others outside of CDC.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/17/health/coronavirus-testing-cdc.html?campaign_id=9&emc=edit_nn_20200918&instance_id=22298&nl=the-morning&regi_id=138924584&section_index=2&section_name=two_more_big_stories&segment_id=38446&te=1&user_id=18c312f7487f6c192e2937023698ec29

Anonymous
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

According to the experts, the key to a successful reopening is vigilant testing. This does not guarantee success (see U Illinois), but it gives institutions a fighting chance to detect and get out in front of cluster formation and community spread. I agree that the reported numbers on the dashboard are extremely low and the decision not to implement vigilant testing (at least 2x/week) is based upon financial considerations rather than health and safety. Hoping for the best has a chance of working, just not a high likelihood.

Anonymous
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

You cite “the experts” but then fault CUA as being less than “vigilant” for following CDC’s — that is, the experts’ — testing guidelines.

Anonymous
13 days ago

I just listened to the first episode of the “Crisis” podcast produced by The Catholic Project, the initiative launched by Pres. Garvey. I was expecting some kind of sugar-coated apologia. Instead, I was stunned by both the candor of the content and the polish of the presentation. Later episodes may change my opinion, but my initial reaction is that this is an extremely thoughtful and well executed production that deserves widespread notice.

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Does it focus on the experiences of the laity or the clergy? The recent survey sent around about The Catholic Project felt a little incoherent, in that it was asking survey participants to rank the potential priority of individual sociological studies, some of which were lay-centered and some of which were focused on Church leadership.

Anonymous
10 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Why not listen to it and then assess it?

Loyal Alum
16 days ago

All – Here’s an interesting pre-COVID-19 article from the Harvard Business Review entitled, “6 Reasons Why Higher Education Needs to Be Disrupted” Key point: Many elite universities prioritize research, often at the expense of teaching: Anyone who spends time in academia will know that the quality of universities, at least as judged by research excellence tables, is predominantly based on research rather than teaching. In many top institutions, teaching can be seen as a distraction from publishing and getting research grants. Top faculty are attracted not just with higher salaries, but also with more freedom and a lower teaching load. In return, they… Read more »

Anonymous
17 days ago

Some food for thought – “A pandemic returns the focus to what matters: education.”; 5 Sep 2020

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/05/opinion/sunday/coronavirus-college-admissions.html

Anonymous
18 days ago

The Catholic University of America should be apolitical.

Given all that we are dealing with at CUA these days, I found this article to be particularly upsetting.

See https://www.ncronline.org/news/politics/texas-bishop-endorses-video-claiming-faithful-catholics-can-t-support-democratic

Unfortunately, I fear that President Garvey and his ultra-conservative administration will support Texas Bishop Joseph Strickland of Tyler, Texas who endorsed a video claiming faithful Catholics can’t support Democratic candidates.
Sadly, I would not be surprised to see CUA becoming part of Liberty University as a way to both solve its financial problems and to complete its move towards becoming a totally conservative religious institution.

Anonymous
13 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I question how much influence the Catholic clergy have on the laity in political matters. As for CUA exerting influence, it can’t even get enough Catholic kids to enroll. Evangelical leadership is a different dimension of power. But CUA does not appear to be remotely in danger of becoming as large, wealthy and consequential as Liberty U.

Anonymous
6 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The University should put out a statement condemning the actions of the Trump Administration’s allegeded mass hysterectomies in ICE detention centers (link). This is spitting in the face of pro-life Catholics.

Anonymous
19 days ago

“Can Higher Ed Survive the Pandemic?” 

Dear CUA Colleagues –

First of all, I hope that you are staying safe.

I found this article to be thought provoking and I would be interested in your thoughts as regards the future of CUA.

See https://carnegieendowment.org/2020/06/02/can-higher-ed-survive-pandemic-pub-82033

Anonymous
20 days ago

More re CUA’s Proposal to Build an Alexandria Education Location Absent the Covid-19 pandemic and its impact on CUA’s current financial posture, the rationale for CUA investing in an Alexandria education center begs a rational response from CUA’s “senior strategic business thinkers”. In normal times, this proposal has merit since both CUA and the Alexandria locations are located next to metro stations and Alexandria is close to many federal government locations. CUA’s biggest competitor in this strategy is Virginia Tech – not George Mason as one of you mentioned. VaTech’s Potomac Yard plans are real and very impressive But the… Read more »

Anonymous
19 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The posted article tells us nothing about how long the satellite project has been in the planning stages. Planning may very well have begun long before COVID. Continuing to pursue government approvals does not necessarily mean that opening of the satellite or further investment is imminent. That said, the question remains: How can CUA, which can’t even meet its enrollment goals at its main campus, expect to compete successfully, from a makeshift satellite space, against established local competitor(s) with greater resources? Has anyone seen a business plan for this boondoggle?

Anonymous
18 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Has anyone ever seen any business plans published by CUA’s administration?

Anonymous
18 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

No need for a plan. Everybody knows there are thousands of Northern Virginians craving a CUA degree but unable to drive or take the Metro to NE Washington.

Anonymous
18 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Whatever happened to CUA’s exquisitely timed partnership with the community college in Tucson, Ariz.?

Anonymous
16 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The Tucson project is apparently operational. See: https://www.catholic.edu/tucson/academic-program/ba-in-management/index.html
What’s interesting to me is that the partner school, Pima Community College, is a public institution, while CUA’s web page for the program promises a “faith-based education.” Maybe in Arizona they don’t take that whole church/state separation thing all that seriously?

Anonymous
17 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous
Anonymous
16 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

According to this article, CUA submitted their plan to the City of Alexandria in May 2020. Obviously, the CUA planners were not aware of the COVID-19 pandemic…..

Anonymous
16 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Of course they were. The WHO declared pandemic status in March. On May 12, Dr. Fauci announced that the current U.S. death toll — at that point reportedly 80,000 — was probably an underestimate. But seeking governmental approval of a land-use plan and actually implementing that plan are two very different things. There’s no reason why the plan couldn’t be submitted for approval during the pandemic, with any implementation to occur well in the future. https://www.ajmc.com/view/a-timeline-of-covid19-developments-in-2020

Anonymous
15 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

My concern is that CUA was developing and submitting a plan to invest some serious money while at the same time considering cost cutting moves focused on the faculty and staff.

Does the word “disingenuous” ring a bell?

Anonymous
15 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Not necessarily disingenuous. Faculty and staff are a cost, period. Investing in a new program with the hope of bringing in new students is an effort to increase revenues. If the university’s revenues grow, eventually it may be able to pay faculty and staff more. There is nothing remarkable about cutting X to get money to invest in Y because you believe Y will yield a financial return. By the way, what is the source for your claim that there was a plan to invest “serious money”? What is your measure of “serious” in this context?

Anonymous
16 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

As described in the Biz Journal piece, sounds a bit like a for-profit trade school.

Anonymous
21 days ago

FYI – Alexandria City Council To Consider CUA’s Proposed Satellite Campus

https://patch.com/virginia/oldtownalexandria/alexandria-city-council-consider-catholic-u-satellite-campus

Ultimately, this looks like a good thing to do.

But, given CUA’s current financial challenges, it is a bit surprising that they are planning this investment right now.

Anonymous
20 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

What can this project offer that George Mason or a community college can’t do cheaper and with nicer facilities?

Anonymous
24 days ago

FYI – Higher-Education-After-COVID19

All – I found this article to be worth a read.

See https://www.jamesgmartin.center/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Higher-Education-After-COVID19-compressed.pdf

I hope that one of you can forward it to CUA’s “executive managers”.

Stay safe

Anonymous
22 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I enjoyed reading it.

A Concerned Friend of CUA
25 days ago

“Public health experts say the best way to prevent infections on campuses from turning into outbreaks is to test every student every few days” How is CUA Doing, you might ask? Universities that are reopening without substantive testing and tracing strategies can’t just point fingers at the students, experts say. “It’s irresponsible and the outcome is predictable, and blaming the students is just misplaced,” says Joshua Salomon, a professor of medicine at Stanford. “A lot of these school reopening plans that bring students back without testing are like turning on a faucet and sternly telling the water not to flow.”… Read more »

Anonymous
25 days ago

Speaking of neglected web sites, CUA’s are among the worst. As of today, the home page of the Busch School still includes the following:
“Our New HomeAfter recently receiving a major gift, the Busch School of Business is eagerly anticipating the completion of the renovation of its new building — with state-of-the-art facilities and resources to help further its mission to use business as a force for good.”
Hasn’t it been a year since the building was completed and completely occupied?

CUA Donor
26 days ago

“This security breach announcement will certainly not help CUA’s Advancement Campaign.”

A letter was sent to CUA donors yesterday describing a data breach that was discovered between February and May 2020.

Data security breaches happen but it is quite disappointing that it took CUA’s senior administration so long to alert CUA’s donors.

See https://engage.catholic.edu/stories/security-incident-blackbaud-2020

Anonymous
26 days ago
Reply to  CUA Donor

Good thing the university has already gotten to $310mm of the campaign’s goal $400mm goal, a fundraising success unprecedented in the university’s history and largely attributable to Pres. Garvey’s initiatives on the advancement front.

anonymous
25 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Your cynical response should be entitled, “Timing is everything”. Or maybe you could just tell the CUA donors, “Too bad about the data breach. But we got your money and we are happy”.

Anonymous
25 days ago
Reply to  CUA Donor

Catholic would appear to be in good company: https://www.thecrimson.com/article/2020/8/13/blackbaud-data-breach/

Anonymous
25 days ago
Reply to  CUA Donor

You say “it took CUA’s senior administration so long to alert CUA’s donors.” When did Blackbaud notify CUA that a breach occurred? At that point, did CUA have all the information it needed to make an accurate report to donors, or was additional time needed to clarify the details of what had happened?
[Edited. Please avoid ad hominem comments]

Tech Un-Savvy and Un-Convinced
27 days ago

Has anyone been able to get into the classrooms that had the technology upgraded to use them? I haven’t heard anything about the new rooms, and if they are as valuable as the Assistant Provost claimed they are, I would have thought that people would be able to get in them, use them, and be trained in them.

I am afraid they are going to be as big a bust as the other claims made by the Provost Office.

Anonymous
28 days ago

Alert to all FA Members – complaining about the lack of shared faculty-administration governance is not kvetching; it’s the right thing to do. As a CUA Alum from the 1960’s, a former adjunct, a long-time corporate volunteer and a long-time contributor to CUA, I am very supportive of the concept of shared governance between the CUA faculty and the CUA administration. I would like to see the CUA adjuctive faculty and support staff be included as well. Given that, I found the following article to be well-worth reading and I want to re-post it in case you missed it. “Will… Read more »

Anonymous
29 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Hello – are you serious?

Your comment makes me think that you are actually part of CUA’s senior administration rather than a member of its faculty.

Anonymous
29 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Bad guess, but irrelevant anyway. What’s interesting to me is that the GW faculty are better paid and employed by a stronger and more prestigious institution, and yet their kvetching sounds indistinguishable from that of CUA faculty in this forum, including calling for the president’s head. Makes me wonder whether it’s an occupational trait.

Anonymous
28 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Another interpretation is that shared governance is eroding everywhere due to the “commercialization” of our academic institutions. This “business model” treats institutions of higher learning in terms of cash-flow vehicles rather than as public good entities. Increasingly, leaders from business or sectors without much academic experience are brought in without much academic leadership training. Youngstown’s president comes to mind… he was a football coach (very good one at that). In any case, top-down leadership occurs at many institutions, even those with hefty endowments. Nice article in the Chronicle on the shared governance issue.

https://www.chronicle.com/article/will-covid-19-revive-faculty-power

Anonymous
28 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

“Increasingly, leaders from business or sectors without much academic experience are brought in without much academic leadership training.” Why doesn’t the same logic apply to question the value of academic/pedagogical experience in the management of large, complex organizations with budgets in the hundreds of millions of dollars, which is what a modern university is? There is a certain hubris in the astrophysicist who would not tolerate an amateur in his laboratory but who insists he is competent to administer aspects of an enterprise far removed from his discipline.

Anonymous
27 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

You raise an interesting point, specifically, whether or not a university produces “widgets” that anyone with a business background can successfully operate. There is sufficient evidence that understanding the core mission of an institution is vital to its successful long-term viability. Even in business, there is anecdotal evidence that domain expertise and understanding is essential. Look at Ron Johnson’s run at JCPeney, the swinging doors at Ford since Alan Mullally’s departure, etc. Sure, from the 10,000 ft view every organization looks the same, but as you approach businesses at a more granular level, understanding the organization’s complexities and keys to… Read more »

Anonymous
27 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I’m not suggesting at all that universities should be managed by people with no knowledge of or experience in the academy. I am suggesting that the administrators also need the particular skills and inclinations found in effective corporate managers. The latter are not typically found in the average faculty member. Administrators who fit both sets of criteria are not easy to find, and that’s one reason why they command substantial compensation.

Anonymous
30 days ago

I am incensed by President Garvey’s letter about CUA and COVID-19. He makes reference to the fact that “people will get sick and recover.” But there is no acknowledgement that nearly 180,000 Americans are dead. People will die.

Anonymous
30 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

what letter?

A Loyal Alum
30 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Dear Incensed Poster –

I realize how upset you are with what is going on at CUA these days.

And I assure you that I am not a fan of Garvey and his efforts to move CUA to the religious and political far right – way before Covid-19 arrived on the scene

But in this case, I think that you may have over-reacted to what I consider to be a sincere letter to the CUA community

See https://mailchi.mp/4b867d9ab8ef/august-news-whats-at-stake

So, let’s all take a deep breath and hope that Garvey and his like-mined administrators will soon retire.

Anonymous
30 days ago
Reply to  A Loyal Alum

If you care about the survival and prosperity of the university, you’d better hope he serves out at least his current term and successfully concludes the historic capital campaign that he brought into being and which has raised hundreds of millions for CUA.

Anonymous
30 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

There is no cause to be “incensed” by that letter. It quite obviously wasn’t speaking about the broad national situation. Rather, it was narrowly focused on the current circumstances of the CUA campus, the inevitability that some infections will occur on campus, and the fact that the university has planned for that (as it should). Anyone “incensed” by the letter is looking for an excuse to be self-righteous.

Loyal Alum
30 days ago

Some food for thought.

“Tuition discounts don’t make sense, increased funding for financial aid does”; 24 Aug 2020

https://www.brookings.edu/blog/brown-center-chalkboard/2020/08/24/tuition-discounts-dont-make-sense-increased-funding-for-financial-aid-does/

Anonymous
1 month ago

College Park residents brace for the return of UMD students – 24 Aug 2020

http://dbknews.com/2020/08/23/umd-college-park-coronavirus-residents-campus-reopening/

Anonymous
1 month ago

AAUP’s Censure List

Speaking of the American Association of University Professor’s list of censured universities, CUA is included in a group of very underwhelming universities.

I wonder if CUA’s Administration even cares.

I wonder what parents would think if they were aware of this.

See https://www.aaup.org/our-programs/academic-freedom/censure-list

Anonymous
1 month ago

Has anyone seen the clause on the “supplemental notices of appointment?” It says it can be terminated with 30 days notice and the stipends prorated. Is this common practice for such appointments?

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I am not a faculty. I am a donor at CUA.

Is this real? It sounds like CUA can layoff a (even tenured) faculty member whenever they want to.

Deeply Concerning…

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Remember that you are talking about a university that for 30 years has been under continuous censure by the American Association of University Professors. Compliance with the norms of the academy ain’t no biggie here.

Anonymous
1 month ago

Notre Dame classes go online for two weeks amid rising COVID-19 cases

CUA is mentioned in this article.

https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/notre-dame-classes-go-online-for-two-weeks-amid-rising-covid-19-cases-28338

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

CUA is gambling that the smaller size of its on-campus cohort — freshman only — will make the difference. But that’s still several hundred teenagers away from home on on their own for the first time. What could go wrong?

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

A lot!

Anonymouss
1 month ago

“Catholic colleges need to learn from Notre Dame about pandemic reality”; 20 Aug 2020

https://www.ncronline.org/news/coronavirus/editorial-catholic-colleges-learn-notre-dame-about-pandemic-reality

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymouss

Take note: This article refers to Notre Dame as the university “whose very name has long been synonymous with the gold standard in Catholic higher education” and doesn’t even mention “The” Catholic University of America.

Anonymouss
1 month ago

“A Yale professor’s brutally honest email about COVID-19 underscores how messed up things are”; 20 Aug 2020

See https://bgr.com/2020/08/20/schools-reopening-amid-coronavirus-yale-email-to-students/

Anonymous
1 month ago

The coronavirus doesn’t care if you vote red or blue. It doesn’t care if you’re religious. And it doesn’t even care how socially distant or careful you’ve been for the last five months. It just wants a chance to replicate. And the next mistake you make could let it in.

Anonymous
1 month ago

Went to campus (briefly) on Monday. Freshmen moving in. Many not wearing masks. Some custodial staff the same–no masks. One campus police officer mask below nose and mouth checking his phone. Not going back there.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Bringing freshmen to campus is, fittingly, a Hail Mary pass. Garvey is 71 years old. If this turns into a debacle, he’ll simply retire.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Unlike CUA, which has brought only freshmen to campus, Notre Dame appears to have allowed all students to return.

Anonymous
1 month ago

CUA Board of Trustee member, Cardinal Timothy Dolan to deliver opening prayer before Trump’s GOP presidential nomination speech.
https://meaww.com/timothy-cardinal-dolan-donald-trump-republican-national-convention-opening-prayer

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Trump brags about sexually assaulting women and gets caught paying hush money to a porn star, but a Catholic cardinal sees nothing wrong with participating in his effort to be reelected president.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Stand by for CUA to give Donald Trump an honorary doctorate…..

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

That’s entirely plausible. There are Trustees who would push it.

anonymous
1 month ago

Washington, DC is a college town.

Did you know that the largest employer outside of the government in DC is George Washington University (the second is Georgetown University, fifth is Howard University, and 7th and 8th are American and Catholic University)?

College towns like Ann Arbor are bracing for a new wave of COVID-19

https://www.theverge.com/21367847/college-towns-campus-coronavirus-pandemic-university-michigan-ann-arbor

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  anonymous

But of that group, CUA is apparently the only university willing to risk the health of several hundred teenagers it is bringing onto campus, not to mention the countless others whom they may infect.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Chapel Hill just folded on online instruction…after ONE WEEK.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Ithaca College just announced this morning they will move online. A colleague of mine at Arizona State told me he is on his 3rd quarantine since the summer. It seems these “on-again, off-again” in-person classes are disruptive to teaching and learning. Good luck to all as we embark on the “grand experiment” that is the fall semester. I hope it works.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  anonymous

If, in mid-semester, CUA switches to online even for the several hundred freshmen it is bringing to campus this week, will it refund any of their tuition?

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Ah… this sounds like a fraud.

I feel really sorry for students.

Anonymous
1 month ago

I’m not signing this bogus ‘contract’ that is standing in for my letter of appointment. I have tenure, which I earned by fulfilling, and continuing to fulfill, the terms of my employment as articulated by the Faculty Handbook and by the norms of my school and my discipline. If the university wants to change those terms they need to specify them. And then I get to decide whether I want to work under them or not. And then they get to decide how to fill the gap that is left behind when a very large number of us somehow forget… Read more »

Ernie Zampelli
1 month ago

As a regular faculty member at CUA for31 years and now as Professor Emeritus, I implore you not to allow this blatant power grab to survive. For more years than I care to remember, as chair of my department, chair and member of the faculty economic welfare committee, and chair of the Senate, this clause is an absolute affront to all faculty who have fought over the many years simply for comparable compensation and benefits as our peers, and for increasing faculty voice and participation in the shared governance of CUA. I do not hesitate to remind you that neither… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Ernie Zampelli

This close to the start of instruction, I would think faculty have the leverage. What is the university going to do if a faculty member just says no?

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

As a tenured faculty member, I will not sign this document, and I urge all others to do the same.

Admin
1 month ago
Reply to  Ernie Zampelli

Thank you for your input and of course, your contributions to CUA over the years… including serving as president of the Faculty Assembly. The faculty have been very vocal and concerned about this latest development. We are hopeful the leadership will walk back this latest misstep.

Anonymous
1 month ago

How can we as faculty respond to challenge the University Administration’s unprecented attack on tenure by seeking faculty signatures to contracts asserting that the University has the discretion to adjust our salary, benefits and stipends as it wishes, with no guidelines, during the course of the academic year? As a faculty member who has loyally served at this institution for more than a decade, I an really shocked at the Administration’s callous lack of support for the faculty during a global pandemic.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I am not sure what the new notification form accomplishes for the administration. Before sending this form out, and at its own “discretion,” the administration has already pulled a benefit: its contribution to our retirement. Thus, it is unclear what the signature is meant to accomplish.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

By asking for the document to be signed, the university is implicitly conceding that it has legal exposure if it takes any of the referenced actions without a signed waiver.

Anonymous
1 month ago

Transforming The Catholic University of America Some commentators on the FA Discussion Board have voiced their great appreciation for President Garvey’s focus on increased advancement rather than on increased student enrollment as the means to increase CUA’s “prestige” A quick review of CUA’s development campaign priorities by divisions will provide some insight into Garvey’s actual strategy. See https://engage.catholic.edu/campaign-priorities/campaign-priorities-divisions Business School: $100M Nursing School: $90M School of Arts & Sciences: $35M School of Theology: $27M Athletics Department: $26M Rome School Music, Drama and Art: $26M School of Engineering: $25M Law School: $21M School of Philosophy: $13M School of Architecture: $8M NCSS:… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

So many things incorrect about this post – where to begin…First, Garvey is not focusing on advancement “rather than” increased enrollment. He wisely recognizes that building resources through a professional Advancement operation is a critical means to improving enrollment. Before the Advancement investments that Garvey instituted, enrollment was lagging. A university like CUA that is mostly dependent on tuition is like a person who lives from paycheck to paycheck: It may get by, but it will never get to the next level of financial strength, and if one year there is an enrollment decline (analogous to an individual losing his… Read more »

CUA Alum
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

In spite of your rather annoying and pedantic response, I find that we are actually in violent agreement that CUA’s current strategy is to become The National Conservative Catholic University of America.

I am really upset about this development but clearly you and others of your persuasion are very supportive.

And that’s OK. I support your right to your opinions and hope that things work out for CUA as it proceeds down this path.

Sadly, unless CUA changes its current ultra-conservative strategy, I will be looking for other more worthy recipients of my future philanthrophic financial and volunteer labor contributions.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Since the Busch (not “Bush”) school doesn’t even offer an MBA degree, perhaps you’re talking about some other university.

CUA Alum
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Thank you for your correction regarding my accidental misspelling of the name. And I am well aware of the fact that CUA’s Busch School does not offer an MBA. According to CUA’s website, “Catholic University’s MSB and MSM degrees are not designed to compete with top tier MBA programs but outperform other lower tier MBA offerings in terms of practical instruction by experienced faculty, a dedicated career services department and an extensive network of job opportunities.” This reads like an excuse for a watered down program for students not qualified to obtain real MBA’s Speaking of Garvey’s strategy to improve… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  CUA Alum

I don’t know what the status of the accreditation process is, but I have no reason to believe — nor do you, I suspect — that it’s not on track. My understanding of the “ordinary professor” title is that it is the highest professorial rank, equivalent to the “full professor” rank more commonly used by American universities. I further understand that it takes years to attain, such that its holders tend to be very senior. The skills required to be a dean don’t necessarily overlap much with those of a senior scholar. And so I don’t find your observation curious… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago

I suppose things could always be worse for CUA students.

Here’s a sad example of the way that the University of Maryland treats its students – 08.13.20

https://dcist.com/story/20/08/13/university-of-maryland-students-campus-apartment-leases/

Anonymous
1 month ago

If you think that things are bad at CUA right now, be thankful that President Garvey is not following what Penn State University is doing – at least, so far.

See https://whyy.org/articles/students-at-penn-state-forced-to-sign-covid-19-liability-waiver-to-participate-in-fall-semester/

Anonymous
1 month ago

Some food for thought in today’s Washington Post

“The bundle of teaching and research was still tightly woven enough, however, that we could tell ourselves the learning was still the heart of the package. Then covid-19 came, and suddenly, the lectures and the homework were the only part schools could still deliver. Yet somehow, few students seem reassured that they’re getting most of what they were paying tuition for.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-pandemic-has-made-clear-that-college-students-are-customers/2020/08/12/cc7b9cc6-dc09-11ea-b205-ff838e15a9a6_story.html