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Jump into a conversation or start a new one. Faculty are invited to share their concerns or insights on a wide-range of topics relevant to the university. Contributors should show each other mutual respect.

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Anonymous
4 hours ago

FYI – “Possible Basis for Garvey’s Reluctance to Require the CUA Community to Receive COVID-19 Vaccinations”; 12 May 2021 This article from the National Catholic Reporter regards the columnist’s alma mater, the Catholic University of America, where President John Garvey has declined to issue a requirement. Hard not to wonder if his reluctance has anything to do with the fact that one of the university’s star conservative professors, Catherine Pakaluk, is a leader in the effort to refuse the vaccine because its development involved stem cell lines originally derived from an aborted fetus. Catherine and Michael Pakaluk are faculty members… Read more »

Anonymous
3 hours ago
Reply to  Anonymous

“Star” status is a relative term, but Catherine Pakaluk does have impressive academic credentials to teach in a business school. As for her two named colleagues, their bios are available on the Busch school web site.

Anonymous
19 hours ago

Question to at least one anonymous poster’s comment regarding how strategic it has been that CUA President Garvey was able to restructure the CUA BOT to his liking,

Do you think that Garvey might now be considering nominating Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone of San Francisco for the next BOT opening?

It would certainly help keep the president of America, Joe Biden from visiting the storied campus of the American Bishops’ University.

See https://apnews.com/article/religion-058bdc0c37aa5ee780e18f4666a999ee

Anonymous
16 hours ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Your question makes little sense for two reasons. First, the heart of Garvey’s restructuring strategy is to get more lay members of the BOT; unlike his predecessors, he recognized that the historical predominance of clerics on the board was not optimal for generating philanthropy. Second, why would one ever think that Biden would come here, rather than to one of the well-known Catholic universities like Notre Dame or Georgetown or Villanova or BC or Fordham? Or, for that matter, Gonzaga?

Anonymous
3 hours ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Let me see if I can clarify things for you.

Clearly, Garvey sought to populate the BOT with trustees that could help with fundraising but he also sought to add trustees that would support his misguided ultra-conservative vision of what CUA should become.

Hello – Biden won’t come to visit CUA because Garvey won’t invite him.

An Old Alumnus
1 day ago

Response to the anonymous posting that, “CUA President John Garvey and former CUA President David O’Connell are certainly in different leagues.” In the fall of 2009, Father O’Connell announced his plan to retire from CUA in the summer of 2010. CUA’s board of trustees recognized his long university service by naming a central administrative building after him. A plaza serving the university and the Brookland neighborhood of Washington, D.C., was also named for him in honor of his vision in helping to create a new combined retail and residential development across the street from campus. At the request of the Archdiocese of Washington,… Read more »

Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  An Old Alumnus

And the bishops have done such a great job running “their” university for the past 130 years.

Anonymous
19 hours ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Excuse me – I thought that you claimed that Garvey and his over-compensated administrative vice presidents along with his hand-picked BOT were running “the bishops’ university” and that they were doing a great job – in spite of all the negative independent performance metrics that CUA has achieved.

Hello. Are you paying attention?

Anonymous
16 hours ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Historically, it’s been run by the bishops, badly. Garvey came along and realized that it was necessary to restructure the board by adding more lay trustees — people of wealth and accomplishment and connections who would donate money and influence others to do so. That’s what successful universities have done since the first stone was laid at Oxford. Look at Maloney Hall and the imminent new nursing school building and dining commons, among other things, to see the wisdom of Garvey’s vision. As has been noted, Garvey considerable achievements may not be enough to dig the university out of the… Read more »

Anonymous
2 days ago

FYI – “Here’s a List of Colleges That Will Require Students or Employees to Be Vaccinated Against Covid-19”; 7 May 2021
One can certainly hope that Garvey will soon come to his senses and join the enlightened universities.
https://www.chronicle.com/blogs/live-coronavirus-updates/heres-a-list-of-colleges-that-will-require-students-to-be-vaccinated-against-covid-19?cid=gen_sign_in

Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Catholic University’s refusal to acknowledge the need for mandatory vaccination is a bit like the Church’s hostile response to Galileo’s scientific discoveries.

Anonymous
2 days ago

A thought-provoking TED Talk entitled, “Do university rankings matter?”

Please pass to CUA President Garvey.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Owghne9K1p4

Anonymous
3 days ago

Response to Poster who feels sorry for President Garvey Dear Colleague – First, let me congratulate your recent very well-written post responding to President Garvey’s ill-advised letter to the CUA Community telling us that he has decided against requiring everyone to receive a Covid-19 vaccination before the start of the Fall 2021 semester. I can see that you are an ardent fan of President Garvey, but you need not feel sorry for him. He has been extremely well compensated and well-housed over the past 10 years and he has been able to achieve his vision of converting our university into… Read more »

Anonymous
3 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

And go back to what? A presidency occupied by an obscure cleric with a mediocre CV who presided over CUA’s removal from the AAU? A guy like Pellegrino, who obviously regretted his decision not long after moving in and bailed out even before his first term was up to take a lesser position at Georgetown? A school without the kind of institutional advancement operation that its competitors have had for decades? CUA’s good old days were a descent into oblivion.

Anonymous
3 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous
Anonymous
3 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I’m fully aware. This sentence from the article you post sums it up: “Convey noted that Catholic’s move was prodded in part by an AAU decision to raise its standards.” Translation: CUA was falling behind in quality and couldn’t catch up. It’s trend that has only continued, and Garvey recognized that only money can slow the slide; hence his prudent focus on Advancement. CUA’s loss of its place in the AAU is a lasting humiliation.

Anonymous
3 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Are you seriously referring to the Rev. David M. O’Connell as “an obscure cleric with a mediocre CV?
According to the CUA website, “He strengthened the university’s historic Catholic identity and character, grew the University’s endowment and oversaw important campus improvements, including construction of the Edward J. Pryzbyla University Center. He purchased 49 acres west of Harewood Road for the university’s future growth.”

Regarding his CV, take a minute to read https://oconnell.catholic.edu/biography/index.html

Anonymous
3 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Tell me your kidding. O’Connell’s academic background — Niagara University (huh?), St. Johns, and CUA itself — doesn’t compare to Garvey’s (Notre Dame and Harvard law school). Their professional accomplishments aren’t comparable — Garvey taught at far better universities, and his deanship of Boston College law school gave him more substantial administrative experience than O’Connell ever had before coming to CUA. Garvey rose early to very top of his profession, with a Court of Appeals clerkship and a stint in the U.S. Solicitor General’s office, the agency whose lawyers represent the U.S. gov’t before the Supreme Court. Garvey published a… Read more »

Anonymous
2 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Sorry, O’Connell and Garvey are in different leagues: https://www.catholic.edu/about-us/leadership/bios/john-garvey/index.html And if you want to talk about accomplishments in office, look at the Conway nursing school, Maloney Hall, the new dining facility, Carlini Field, and a capital campaign that is closing in on $400 million.

Anonymous
3 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

In the opinion of many, CUA was indeed fortunate to have had the services of Dr Edward Pelligrino, MD as its president.

Anonymous
3 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

He could have been great, but he bailed out after just four years. Explain that.

Anonymous
3 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Take a look around, my friend. CUA is in oblivion thanks to President Garvey’s misguided “leadership”.

Anonymous
2 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The journey to oblivion began long before Garvey arrived, as illustrated by this Washington Post story, published 40 years ago, reporting on Pellegrino’s premature resignation from the CUA presidency and describing the university as “financially squeezed.” https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/local/1981/10/15/cu-president-to-resign-return-to-teaching/5fed3c94-7a72-4f74-b7a1-d0c250a8b9ef/ Pellegrino might have stayed and worked to build the resources to lift the university’s stature, but he didn’t. He, or another of Garvey’s predecessors, might have recognized how the university’s Board of Trustees was not well structured to facilitate philanthropy, but they didn’t. It was Garvey who did those things, not any of his predecessors. If the university has a future [edited], it… Read more »

Anonymous
2 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I hate to burst your bubble, but Garvey’s “reforms” have not done anything to improve CUA’s national rankings, nor its plummeting student enrollments, nor its standing as a research university nor its demoralized faculty.

The good news is that Garvey has been well-paid and well-housed during his decade of personal sacrifice for CUA.

Anonymous
2 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

It is entirely possible that the Garvey reforms came too late and that there is nothing that will salvage the place.

Anonymous
2 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

According to CUA’s website, Edmund D. Pellegrino, CUA President from 1978-1982,was a medical doctor specializing in ethics.

I think having a CUA president known for his positive ethics is a good thing even if he only served 4 years.

Does that make sense to you?

Anonymous
2 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

On paper, yes, he was great. But Pellegrino did the university more harm than good. Quitting that quickly was institutionally destabilizing and publicly embarrassing. He effectively declared that the place wasn’t worth his commitment. It was especially insulting to CUA that he quit the presidency to take a lesser job at Georgetown. I always assumed he found the university too far gone to justify devoting his prime years to leading it, but maybe there’s another back story that hasn’t been told.

Anonymous
2 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I have absolutely no problem with Dr Pellegrino’s decision to resign from CUA when he did.

He was not a fundraiser and the BOT knew that when they hired him. Maybe the BOT could have hired a high-powered development office to allow Dr Pellegrino to stay.

I suggest that you read this previously posted Washington Post article [edited]:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/local/1981/10/15/cu-president-to-resign-return-to-teaching/5fed3c94-7a72-4f74-b7a1-d0c250a8b9ef/

Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Anonymous

And if they had “hired a high-powered development office,” faculty would have complained about those administrative salaries, just as it does today, 40 years later.

Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Anonymous

It is illegal and against constitutional rights to force experimental drug into human body. While I do not agree with President Garvey on some moves, I applaud him as a lawyer on this issue.

You don't have to be a lawyer
1 day ago
Reply to  Anonymous

This is utterly misleading and unfounded. First of all, these vaccines are simply not “experimental” as that word is applied in pharmaceutical development. That’s a common and tedious anti-vaxxer canard. These vaccines are authorized under EUA rules, and they have all been put through standard safety testing, including animal testing, before being administered to the public. All 4 of the big vaccines, (Pfizer, J&J, Moderna, and AstraZenica) have gone through phase three human trials, the results of which have been published in peer-reviewed journals. As a lawyer, maybe even John Garvey knows this; as a constitutional lawyer he certainly knows… Read more »

Anonymous
1 day ago
Reply to  Anonymous

A return-to-campus vaccine mandate is not the same as “forc[ing] experimental drug into human body.” Those who chose not to vaccinate can stay online. There are options. The lawyer in Garvey may look at risk of litigation, but perhaps safety and health of the entire CUA community (i.e. students, staff, and faculty) should come a bit above, eh?

Anonymous
4 days ago

Facebook and YouTube have permanently banned Life Site News from their websites for violating their COVID-19 policies because they distribute “vaccine discouraging information on their platform” and publish “false information about COVID-19 that “could contribute to physical harm.” https://www.washingtonpost.com/religion/lifesitenews-removed-from-facebook-for-violating-covid-19-misinformation-policies/2021/05/06/13131368-aea9-11eb-82c1-896aca955bb9_story.html

Anonymous
5 days ago

In case anyone is wondering who the people are in our “community” against science and the wellbeing of the rest of us, just head to Twitter and watch them celebrate.

https://twitter.com/DrJayRichards/status/1390643866399817732

By the way, here is the latest information on Life Site News: https://www.ncronline.org/news/coronavirus/lifesitenews-removed-facebook-violating-covid-19-misinformation-policies

Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

It’s amazing that some in CUA’s Busch Business School are apparently not aware of the following.

FYI – Association of American Physicians and Surgeons (AAPS) – Media Bias Fact Check

See https://mediabiasfactcheck.com/association-of-american-physicians-and-surgeons-aaps/

Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Richards’ tweet cites something called “the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons.” To be clear, this fringe group is not the AMA. See:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Association_of_American_Physicians_and_Surgeons
More and more, CUA does not appear to be a place for serious intellectual endeavor.

Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

At some point you have to wonder whether members of the broader academy will start to boycott CUA-sponsored conferences and other events, both in protest of the university’s science-denial and as a matter of personal health safety.

Anonymous
4 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I don’t think the university administration and the BOT realize how much alumni support is lost due to sheer embarrassment.

Anonymous
5 days ago

USM Chancellor Dr Jay A. Perman’s science-based letter mandating COVID vaccinations for all Students, Faculty, and Staff in the University of Maryland System was previously posted – https://www.usmd.edu/newsroom/news/2154Comparing Dr Perman’s letter to CUA President Garvey’s inane letter describing why CUA will not mandate COVID-19 vaccinations of the CUA community makes me sad, embarrassed, fearful and very angry. I think that now is the time for CUA’s faculty to express its outrage at Garvey’s lack of leadership and submit another “Vote of No Confidence” to the CUA Board of Trustees. My hope is that are a few trustees who are not… Read more »

Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Completely agree. Would Garvey survive another confidence vote? Consider: the fall of CUA’s standing; decimation of graduate programs; poor faculty pay suspension of contributions to retirement (likely to continue into 2022); hiring of more administrators; payments to consultants; etc.

Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

According to the National Catholic Reporter article posted in another thread, Garvey specifically talked about how a vaccination mandate might affect enrollment. So it’s hard not to conclude that expected enrollment impact played some role in his decision.

Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Try to imagine how parents of CUA students will react to Garvey’s letter.

It is not too difficult to imagine that his letter will likely have a negative impact on enrollment.

Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

You’re right. Most people are more influenced by the zeitgeist of the moment rather than by their own independent, nuanced assessment of data, and the wave of vaccine mandates by more prestigious colleges creates a sense of illegitimacy around CUA’s position. In this context, why should my kid take a chance? For what – to attend the 143rd best college in the country?

Anonymous
4 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Well stated.

Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Garvey’s statement said vaccination would not be mandated “[u]nless events take an unexpected turn”. In other words, unless there’s a surge of infections within the CUA community. By then, of course, it will be too late. The callous irresponsibility of Garvey’s position is breathtaking. What’s behind it? Not that enrollment concerns would justify rolling the dice with a lethal threat, but is there actual data suggesting a significant adverse impact on enrollment if vaccination were mandatory? Is Garvey succumbing to pressure from the sort of extremists within the community who celebrate the death of a Supreme Court justice on Twitter… Read more »

Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

By the way, a tweet from Massimo Faggioli of Villanova questioning our president’s “leadership” (https://twitter.com/MassimoFaggioli/status/1390422932715982849) was met with this statement from our neighbors at Trinity: “Across the street @trinitydc we announced about a month ago that we are requiring ALL persons on campus to get the vaccine — not only students but also faculty, staff, vendor personnel — and we have had a great deal of support for this. It’s very “pro-life” to protect people!” We look like idiots, and people aren’t afraid to call us out on it. I don’t know about anyone else in this assembly, but Garvey’s… Read more »

Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The responses to Faggioli’s tweet should be mortifying to CUA.

Anonymous
4 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I agree completely that it is time for another no confidence vote. Garvey is increasingly dangerous to the welfare of our community. He is is disregarding the views of the vast majority of us in favor of quackery and pseudoscience. He is undermining the academic standing and reputation of our University. I doubt his approach will help enrollment and it is likely to continue to slide downwards under his leadership.

Anonymous
4 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I feel badly for Garvey because he’s been an enormously positive force for the university and yet has found himself in an untenable position with this vaccine issue. I don’t think there can be any real dispute that he’s the most competent president in the university’s history. He inherited a mediocre institution in decline and, although he hasn’t been able to halt its slide, he’s almost certainly bought it time by instituting Advancement and governance changes that were overdue by generations. But to do so — to raise money, bluntly — he had to make a bargain with some of… Read more »

Anonymous
6 days ago

FYI – Letter to the Holy Cross College Community re Required COVID-19 Vaccinations and a Hopeful Return in the Fall; April 27, 2021 Dear Members of the Holy Cross Community, As we look forward to the end of the semester and even further into the fall, there are many reasons to be optimistic. One of the most important causes of optimism is the increasing availability of vaccines against COVID-19. Earlier this year, I told you all we planned to be back to a more normal campus experience in the fall. One way we will accomplish this goal is to have… Read more »

Anonymous
6 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

A prestigious school like Holy Cross enjoys the customer demand needed to enforce a mandatory vax rule. Lesser schools don’t.

Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

There are plenty of not extremely selective institutions on the Chronicle list.

Anonymous
3 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

You see: this is very easy to do.

Anonymous
6 days ago

Garvey’s letter about the decision not to mandate covid vaccines: https://president.catholic.edu/communications/letters/looking-forward-to-post-covid.html Dear Members of the University Community, Next week we will celebrate an in-person commencement for the Class of 2021. We will honor the achievements of our graduates, and of this community. Holding an in-person event of this magnitude is a huge achievement for a University that was entirely virtual just one year ago. We’ve come a long way.   As we look forward to next fall, there are many reasons to hope we can resume many aspects of University life as we knew it pre-Covid. The rising vaccination rates… Read more »

Anonymous
6 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Why make something mandatory when 85% of the population has already indicated they are going to get the vaccine, and odds are the remaining 15% would never get the vaccine anyway and would probably fight you tooth and nail about their God-given right to be anti-vaccination? I think this is actually a wise move by Garvey. Those who want the vaccine to be mandatory will get the vaccine anyway, and those who don’t want the vaccine to be mandatory won’t have a public venue to spout fake news or right-wing rhetoric. Let the crazies in the Busch School bask in… Read more »

Anonymous
6 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Interesting point. But I don’t see how the 15% could get away with “never get[ting] the vaccine anyway” if it were mandatory and all were required to provide proof of vaccination. Students in the 15% would be barred from enrolling, and faculty/staff would lose their jobs. Garvey’s position does help avoid a fight, but at what cost in terms of moral courage and risk to his constituencies’ health?

Anonymous
6 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The 15% would claim the religious, moral, and conscience exception, and would wear that as a badge of courage and uber-conservative “holier than thou” attitude. Why would you want to further divide the community?

Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I see your point and you may be right. But the decision may make the institution’s public image seem even more fringe-y, if that’s possible.

Anonymous
6 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

So how about a broader survey of opinion as to what other vaccinations can also be optional? And then “respect that opinion,” while selling to the CDC and Big Pharma data about the ensuing health catastrophes? That would be a marriage of libertarianism and profiteering worthy of the Busch school.

Anonymous
6 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Only an enterprise that has contempt for science would allow lay “opinion” to dictate public health decisions.

Anonymous
6 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Once again, CUA President Garvey demonstrates his visionary leadership and ensures that CUA does not follow the COVID-19 vaccination requirements of such obviously liberal Catholic institutions as Notre Dame University, DePaul University, Georgetown University, Loyola University Chicago, Fordham University, Boston College and Holy Cross College.

I hope that our Brookland neighbors will be understanding.

Anonymous
6 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

So if 35-40% of survey respondents did not support required vaccination, 60-65% did, given that it was a yes/no question. Sounds like a mandate to me, especially given that the university already has exemption frameworks in place for those who want or need them. I am completely unable to find a logical argument here against requiring vaccination for the entire campus.

Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

No, we can’t be the most open campus given the number of people who are now going to want or need to work remotely.

Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

President Garvey’s communication about not requiring the COVID vaccine for Fall 2021 was extremely incoherent and out-of-touch. First, leadership by survey IS NOT leadership. Second, collecting survey results that show 2/3rd of your community favor a vaccine mandate and then going against the results IS NOT “evidence based practice”; it is “full speed ahead, iceberg be damned!” Just poor decision-making. For a coherent message, see the one by Georgetown’s esteemed president: https://president.georgetown.edu/vaccine-update-for-students-april-2021/#_ga=2.245752516.1740106480.1618514216-1980271454.1614807297.

Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Our neighbors to the north at UMD have actually used science, logic, and risk/benefits analysis to make an informed decision about mandating the vaccine for the UMD-wide system for AY21-22. Somehow, I feel much more reassured by following the logic than reading yesterday’s statement by Garvey. Does the entire President’s Cabinet also support this decision? It does raise doubt regarding the competence of decision-making. Here is UMD’s statement by its chancellor: https://www.usmd.edu/newsroom/news/2154

Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous
Anonymous
4 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

This is a stupendously irresponsible and feckless letter from President Garvey. If making this campus as safe as possible is the objective (and how could it not be?), then to not mandate vaccinations flies in the face of reason. But reason is clearly out the window here. To write the words “unless things take an unexpected turn” is to contemplate that such a thing is quite possible–and that is the only prudent and safe assumption to make at this point in the pandemic, especially as the US’s almost certain failure to achieve herd immunity will mean the mutation to more… Read more »

Anonymous
6 days ago

“CUA Still Undecided About Requiring COVID-19 Vaccinations”; 6 May 2021 Full Article at: https://www.ncronline.org/news/coronavirus/catholic-colleges-universities-debate-covid-19-vaccine-requirements Excerpt follows At the Catholic University of America (CUA), faculty pressed President John Garvey to adopt a vaccination requirement at an April 22 meeting of the faculty senate, according to minutes of the meeting reviewed by NCR and confirmed by two attendees. Garvey said at the meeting that while such a measure is being reviewed and most of the comments he had received in-person were favorable, his office has also received emails opposing a requirement. The president noted, according to the minutes, that CUA would be legally… Read more »

Anonymous
6 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

“Impactful on potential enrollment figures”? If an institution’s financial stability is so precarious that the effect on tuition revenue makes it hesitate to maximize protection of the health of its own community, then maybe that institution doesn’t really need to persist.

Anonymous
6 days ago

This generous gift happened because the extraordinary benefactors support and value the work of nurses. In 2021, CUA’s BSN program was ranked #27 by US News, and its online MSN program was ranked #5, well above #143. https://www.usnews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-nursing-schools/the-catholic-university-of-america-33048#:~:text=The%20Catholic%20University%20of%20America%20is%20ranked%20No.,widely%20accepted%20indicators%20of%20excellence.

Anonymous
6 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The Conways have spent $80-million on a nursing program at a university that won’t require students, faculty, and staff to get vaccinated. Strange.

Anonymous
6 days ago

With this announcement of the latest $20-million gift, I have to laugh at all the comments on this thread deriding Garvey for investing in Advancement and underestimating the significance of his reorganization of the Board of Trustees. If predecessor leadership had taken Garvey’s approach decades ago and maintained with discipline and skill, the university might be ranked higher today. https://communications.catholic.edu/news/2021/05/conway-pledge.html

Anonymous
6 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Two honorary degrees and naming a school after the donors look like good investments.

Makes one wonder when Tim and Steph Busch will receive their honorary doctorates of business administration.

Anonymous
6 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

There is nothing unusual about colleges awarding honorary degrees to benefactors. Successful universities have been doing it strategically for generations.

Anonymous
6 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I doubt that thinking people are deriding Garvey for “investing in Advancement”.

Rather, they are deriding Garvey for selling CUA’s soul to ultra-right wing conservatives while watching CUA’s national rankings and enrollments plummet.

And this is not a laughing matter.

Anonymous
6 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

As if the rankings and enrollment would be better in the absence of the money that Garvey has attracted.

Anonymous
6 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

This has little to do with Garvey or the University’s institutional advancement. The Conways give generously to area nursing programs because of their interest in supporting nurses not CUA. See their recent gift to UMD. https://www.baltimoresun.com/education/bs-md-maryland-school-nursing-donation-20210210-x5dl2wfnyfg3tjiu6f22ynkcri-story.html

Anonymous
5 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Nonsense. The UM gift was $13-mm versus $80-mm to CUA. Garvey managed to get Conway on the CUA BoT, which evidences Conway’s interest in the university as a whole. Garvey initiated a capital campaign unprecedented in the university’s history (a rather incredible fact) and the campaign is close to its $400-mm goal — that’s institutional advancement of a caliber never seen here before Garvey kickstarted it. Again and again in this forum, I see attacks on Garvey that are simply pathetic in terms of their lack of factual basis and logic.

Anonymous
6 days ago

FYI – “University Appoints New Associate Vice President for Enrollment Management”; 05.04.21

https://communications.catholic.edu/news/2021/05/enrollment-vp.html

Anonymous
8 days ago

Just what we need: Another new Associate Vice President!

Anonymous
6 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Refernce?

Admin
11 days ago

Please note that the CUA Tower has published an article on rankings at CUA.
http://cuatower.com/2021/04/cua-ranks-last-among-d-c-universities-whats-next/

Anonymous
11 days ago

“Timing is everything”

The CUA Tower student newspaper should have waited one week before publishing this article given that 1 May 2021, is college decision day for high school seniors.

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Maybe, but the USN rankings data has been available since Sept 2020 so I doubt it will have much impact.

Anonymous
10 days ago

CUA shouldn’t be highly ranked for journalism, either: This story contains no comment from anyone in the administration nor any indication that anyone in the administration was asked to comment and declined.

Anonymous
9 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

True, it is not known if the Tower reached out to CUA Administration about CUA’s national rankings. CUA Admin could publicly address the Tower article if they wished- it would be nice to know what they are thinking. The greater question is what will CUA Admin do to improve the rankings? Raising tuition and taking more resources from faculty hurts CUA in the long run. Where do all those dollars go?

Last edited 9 days ago by Anonymous
Anonymous
8 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The burden is not on the subject to chase the journalist after a negative story is published; basic fairness calls for the journalist to solicit the subject’s comment before publication. In an event, let’s be clear about what’s going on here. The FA has just recently stumbled upon rankings as a perceived cudgel in its campaign for higher pay and better benefits, and has put a bee in the bonnet of student journalists who’ve elected to attend the 143rd best college in America. Was CUA materially better off at No. 123, its US News rank a few years ago? CUA’s… Read more »

Anonymous
8 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The commenter is missing the point. The FA has raised an issue of declining rankings (which is true) and suggests that strategic thinking and action can correct this downward trend. Its statement proposes several lines of action and potential solutions to do so. All constituents (i.e. faculty, staff, students, BoT, leadership, parents, alums, etc) should want rankings to go up. I’m not clear on why there is debate about wanting to improve rankings. Rankings (a poor proxy for prestige) affects enrollment and other issues that ails the university. A knee-jerk reaction to cutting salaries will provide a sliver of short-term… Read more »

A Very Disappointed Friend of CUA
11 days ago

What does CUA and Fox News have in common? 

They both had no problem inviting whom many consider to be the worst Secretary of State in American history to speak.

(1) Former Secretary of State Pompeo to join Fox News Media
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-fox-mike-pompeo/former-secretary-of-state-pompeo-to-join-fox-news-media-idUSKBN2BV2CF

(2) Mike Pompeo Visits Catholic University, Stresses Importance of Religious Freedom
http://cuatower.com/2021/04/mike-pompeo-visits-catholic-university-stresses-importance-of-religious-freedom/

Next, I anticipate CUA inviting Rudy Giuliani and Larry Kudlow to speak on campus.

However, I do not anticipate CUA inviting President Biden or Vice President Harris to speak on campus.

Anonymous
10 days ago

Kudlow has already been to campus and spoke at — you guessed it – the Busch school. Kudlow is a bit of a cartoon, but Pompeo is harder dismiss. Pompeo was first in his class at West Point, a Harvard Law grad who worked at Williams & Connolly, and a former member of Congress and the director of the CIA before Secy of State. He’s a serious guy, regardless of his politics.

Anonymous
12 days ago

For what it’s worth, the Center for World University Rankings (CWUR) ranked CUA 260 out of 347 US universities and 1126 out of 2000 world universities.

CUA’s low national ranking is not surprising.

But what is surprising is the identity of a number of US universities ranked lower than CUA. Makes one wonder about the criteria used by the CWUR

See https://cwur.org/2021-22/country/usa.php

Anonymous
12 days ago

    American Universities Have Lost Their PrestigeBy Victor Davis Hanson April 29, 2021 https://www.nationalreview.com/2021/04/american-universities-have-lost-their-prestige/ Today’s universities and colleges bear little if any resemblance to postwar higher education. Nothing is stranger than the contemporary American university. Not long ago, Americans used to idolize their universities. Indeed, in science, math, engineering, medicine, and business, many of these meritocratic departments and schools remain among the top-ranked in the world. Top-notch higher education explains much of the current scientific, technological, and commercial excellence of the United States. After World War II — won in part because of superior American scientific research, production, and logistics — a college degree… Read more »

Anonymous
13 days ago

Finally, a student activity where CUA is ranked in the top 10

https://www.rollcall.com/2021/04/29/racial-gap-persists-among-capitol-hill-interns/

Anonymous
14 days ago

Before you say “Thank you, Len”, you might want to re-read this Washington Post article about CUA BOT member and adviser to CUA’s business school, Leonard Leo.

Len appears to be a master in acquiring and dispensing “dark money”.

“Federalist Society’s Leonard Leo is helping Trump make courts more conservative”; Washington Post; 21 May 2019

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2019/investigations/leonard-leo-federalists-society-courts/

Anonymous
14 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Unfortunately, CUA will be known by the company it keeps.

Anonymous
14 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

When you can say he’s done something unlawful, let us know.

Anonymous
12 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

He’s done many things contrary to Catholic Social Teaching. Does that matter?

Anonymous
11 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Do tell us what are the “many” things he has done contrary to CST?

Anonymous
14 days ago

Maybe the “anonymous donor” to the CUA Law School is not so anonymous after all.

Recall that on April 17, 2019, the CUA Law Federalist Society hosted an event entitled “The Structural Constitution” with speaker Leonard A. Leo, Esq., Executive Vice President of The Federalist Society

See https://www.law.edu/news-and-events/2019/04/2019-0429-FedSocietyEvent.html

Anonymous
14 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

If Leo is behind the $4.25-million gift to the law school, three words are called for: Thank you, Len.

Anonymous
15 days ago

Finally, a bit of good news – 04.26.21
“Columbus School of Law Receives $4.25 Million Gift:
See https://communications.catholic.edu/news/2021/04/law-originalism-gift.html

Anonymous
15 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

This is not necessarily good news. From the wording of the announcement, this gift is likely from similar far right groups who are supporting the business school and increasingly dominate the BOT. The work the gift is funding is virtually certain to be politically motivated. There is a danger that packing the law school with extremist faculty (originalism is code for far right Republican) will unbalance it as an institution and may even harm its reputation for serious scholarship.

Anonymous
14 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I feel very strongly that CUA should not accept politically motivated donations – especially from “anonymous donors”

Anonymous
14 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Originalism is a legitimate theory of constitutional interpretation; you don’t have to agree with it to accept that it’s a worthy subject of scholarship. I’d be more concerned that woke ideology stifles debate and inquiry. In some situations, anonymity can mislead or obscure. But in this case, where the object of the gift is plainly disclosed, the identity of the donor is rather irrelevant.

Anonymous
14 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

There are a few legacy exceptions, but overall the law school faculty is solid. The most recent hire is a former Alito clerk, which means he’s as conservative as they come, but his CV is golden and he appears to be brilliant and that’s what counts when it comes to boosting a school’s reputation. The business school’s practice of filling precious faculty slots with right-wing idealogues who lack any credentials in business or economics has not, in recent times, been the law school’s model. But the risk is there and there are others as well. For example, an “originalist/Catholic Thought”… Read more »

Anonymous
15 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

This underscores the value of Advancement and the wisdom of Garvey’s focus on long-neglected fundraising. The “originalism” angle of this particular project has Leonard Leo’s fingerprints all over it, but if the money is used to hire well-respected personnel, however conservative they may be, it can enhance the law school’s reputation. Conservative enclaves can win respect and prestige in the academy and the profession — the law schools of BYU and George Mason are good examples — IF their personnel and work product reflects intellectual excellence. The danger is that the law school will be pressured to staff the new… Read more »

Anonymous
15 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Wonderful news! Now CU can really be at the vanguard of overturning long precedents, like Brown v. Board of Education, child-labor laws, and abortion rights. We can be leaders in getting back to a Constitution whose authors clearly meant it to apply only to white male property owners. Yay.

Anonymous
16 days ago

What is CUA Waiting For re Requiring COVID-19 Vaccinations? As of 04.24.21, the list of Universities that won’t Let Students Back Without COVID-19 Vaccine include: Yale University, American University, Georgetown University, Stanford University, Manhattanville College, Vassar College, Grinnell College, Bowdoin College, George Washington University, Emory University, Clark Atlanta University, Morehouse College, Spelman College, College of the Atlantic, Seattle University, Fairleigh Dickson University, Assumption University, Duke University, Brown University, Northeastern University, the University of Notre Dame, Syracuse University, Ithaca College, Cornell University, Rutgers University, DePaul University and Columbia College, Nova Southeastern University, Roger Williams University, Fort Lewis College, and St. Edwards University… Read more »

Anonymous
16 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Here’s a theory: The answer is desperation about enrollment. Admin is afraid that mandatory vax rule will turn off some tuition-payers. As a bonus, the thinking may go, a no-vax-required policy might attract a few transfers from wacky anti-vax families.

Anonymous
21 days ago

Possible Lessons for CUA – New book, ‘When Colleges Close”

Wheelock College Merged with Boston University

“While we were not on the verge of closure, many data points including regional demographics, first-year discount rates, graduate debt load and deferred maintenance were part of an increasing trend pointing to budgetary challenges and concerns about our ability to offer a high-quality experience for our students.”

“Our Board of Trustees was examining this well before the decision was made to seek an outside partner.”

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2021/04/21/authors-discuss-their-new-book-when-colleges-close?utm_source=Inside+Higher+Ed&utm_campaign=60277d9274-DNU_2021_COPY_02&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_1fcbc04421-60277d9274-236411834&mc_cid=60277d9274&mc_eid=0ee291b326

Anonymous
21 days ago

Another 2021 Ranking of Catholic Colleges and Universities For what it’s worth, here is the latest College Consensus list of the top 25 Catholic Colleges and Universities See https://www.collegeconsensus.com/rankings/best-catholic-colleges/ According to their website, “The College Consensus methodology pulls together rankings from U.S. News & World Report, The Wall Street Journal, Money, and Wallethub, averaging all of a given school’s numbers to get the Publisher Rating. Then we average student reviews from sites like Cappex, Niche, Student Review, and more, to get the full picture of how students see their colleges, which we call the Student Review Rating. Put them together,… Read more »

anonymous 1
21 days ago

The Catholic University of America is in need of a paradigm shift while holding onto the basic good tenets of Catholicism : charity, acceptance, kindness and respect for all. The gifts of all Schools as fostered by faculty outreach to communities outside of CUA acreage,must be advertised, encouraged and rewarded by not only Admin, but by each other. We all know the value of RESEARCH DAY in academic inquiry. Without question we applaud the faculty advisors and the awarded researchers. Terrific! However, where art thou in going from ” Research Bench” to significant contributions in non-student, real peoples lives? Where… Read more »

Anonymous 2
20 days ago
Reply to  anonymous 1

Dear Anonymous 1 – I applaud your good thoughts about the need for the faculty to work together for the common good and to let the CUA community (at least) know what pro bono contributions are being made to help the surrounding community. You may not be aware of what CUA is already doing in this regard. One exceptional example is the Catholic Law Pro Bono Program. See https://law.edu/students/probono/index.html. But I do not agree with your statement that “Times for fighting the top must end”. To cease struggling against the things that the misguided administration is doing that are an… Read more »

Anonyous
23 days ago

Referring to CUA as “The Bishops’ University” Is an Embarrassing Marketing Ploy  Based on some cursory research, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (UCCB) has an annual budget of ~$200M. And they typically distribute ~$113M to various causes (see below). In 2014, the UCCB gave $5.8M to CUA – that represents ~3% of the UCCB’s total budget.  One might conclude that CUA is not high on the list of the UCCB’s priorities. Rather than referring to CUA as “The Bishops’ University”, it might be more appropriate to refer to CUA as “The Koch University” ________________________________________________________________________________ See https://www.usccb.org/offices/public-affairs/church-finances The 10 national collections… Read more »

Anonymous
24 days ago

As we wrestle with the problems besetting CUA these days involving its poor national rankings and its decreasing enrollments and its difficulties in retaining and recruiting highly qualified faculty members, it might be worthwhile to re-read this article:
“A battle over ‘Catholic identity’ at Catholic University of America”; Jun 26, 2018

See https://www.ncronline.org/news/people/battle-over-catholic-identity-catholic-university-america

Anonymous
24 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I have to laugh at the constant claim that “we’re the bishops’ university.” Do the bishops think that? What good do they do “their” university? The annual collection obviously doesn’t contribute enough resources to halt CUA’s long slide in prestige as measured by every conceivable metric – rankings, enrollment, applicant credentials, faculty resources, general reputation. It’s ironic that the university’s unaccredited business school is dominated by free market zealots because ultimately it’s the market that is suffocating CUA: Customers aren’t buying what the school is selling.

Anonymous
25 days ago

Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education Ranking of Best universities in Washington DC; Nov 2020

Spoiler Alert – CUA ranked 5th behind
Georgetown
GWU
Howard
American University

For details, see https://www.timeshighereducation.com/student/best-universities/best-universities-washington-dc

Anonymous
25 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Isn’t 5th another way of saying Last? Or Worst?

Anonymous
25 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Yes, but I was just trying to be kind……:)

Anonymous
25 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The recent posts on this forum about rankings bring to the surface an inconvenient truth about CUA that is rarely expressed bluntly but needs to be: Simply stated, the university lacks prestige. That deficit is the sum of all its deficiencies and the engine of its downward trajectory.

Anonymous
26 days ago

Dear President Garvey – As a friend of CUA, I am appalled at how poor CUA has been faring in the annual US News Rankings of American universities. Accordingly, I respectfully request that you take the following steps to get CUA back on course. • Form a standing National Rankings Committee (NRC) with the responsibility of generating the annual response to the US News Common Data Set questionnaire. • Identify the costs for the NRC in CUA’s annual expense budget • Require the NRC to conduct regular Pareto analyses (e.g. https://toggl.com/blog/pareto-analysis) of the data to prioritize CUA’s specific correction investments each… Read more »

Admin
27 days ago

Dear colleagues, please note that we have posted a Draft Statement on CUA U.S. News Rankings on the website. If you have any comments or suggestions as to how to best revise the statement, please let us know, either by commenting here or by e-mailing cuafacultyassembly@gmail.com. Your feedback is appreciated. Thanks!

Anonymous
27 days ago

Recommendation 5 falsely states that faculty compensation “accounts for 7% of the overall ranking score.” According to the draft statement, faculty compensation accounts fo 7% of the “faculty resources” subcategory, which in turn accounts for 20% of the “overall score.” Thus, faculty compensation accounts or less than 2% of the overall ranking score.

Anonymous
27 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

That CUA faculty would publicly screw up such basic math may help explain the university’s ranking. And for those FA members who regularly excoriate John Garvey, what do you say about those of your colleagues who are responsible for this mess of a document?

Anonymous
27 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

It’s not 7% of 20% (1.4%). It’s 7 OUT OF the 20% (35% of 20%, or, as the document correctly states, 7% of the whole). It’s this Garvey defender who needs help with basic math and careful reading. 8+7+3+1+1=20. The document is excellent.

Anonymous
27 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

According to USNWR’s methodology, “faculty resources” make up 20% of the overall score. Faculty compensation is not 7% of the 20% (1.4% of final weight, 7%*20%) as suggested by the commenter, but rather 7% of the OVERALL final weight. If you add up all the sub-categories in this bucket, the total is 20%. Link to methodology: https://www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/articles/how-us-news-calculated-the-rankings

Anonymous
26 days ago

According to the magazine (https://www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/articles/how-us-news-collects-rankings-data), “U.S. News collected the data for the 2021 Best Colleges rankings in spring and summer 2020. The survey uses an online, password-protected data collection system. The data collection process has a considerable amount of data validation built into the three separate statistical surveys to prevent schools from entering incorrect data. As the final step in the data collection process, U.S. News asks each school to sign an electronic data verification form stating that its data is accurate. After the data is submitted, analysts at U.S. News review schools’ submissions to detect outliers and inaccuracies, comparing schools’… Read more »

Anonymous
26 days ago

It is clear to me that CUA’s senior management cares about its accreditation but it does not care about its national ranking.  And I expect that CUA’s senior management will ignore the FA Statement as just another complaint about faculty compensation If the FA wants to see some actions to improve the university’s national rankings, then the FA should (1) Identify a few BOT members that can be convinced that CUA’s national ranking and its accreditation status are equally important. (2) Provide the final FA Statement to them directly or indirectly via outside “Friends of CUA”. (3) Stand by to watch… Read more »

Anonymous
26 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

They care about nothing more than they care about enrollment, because that’s existential. If you can link rankings to enrollment, you’ll get the BOT’s attention.

Anonymous
28 days ago

Does the reality behind this new “medical research center” live up to its press-release headline? Is there really a there, there? A lot of times CUA makes a big announcement of an initiative that then quickly fades away. An example is the business school’s supposed affiliation with Carly Fiorina, ballyhooed for about 10 minutes and then never heard of again. Wondering whether this “medical research center” amounts to anything of substance. https://communications.catholic.edu/news/2021/04/bacteriophage-medical-center.html

Anonymous
29 days ago

Another awful story featuring CUA and the wealthy extremists keeping it afloat for political ends: https://www.ncronline.org/news/opinion/wealthy-conservative-catholics-are-new-us-magisterium

Anonymous
28 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

If you don’t have time to read the entire article, these four paragraphs summarize the situation at CUA today. (1) Busch’s law firm helps the ultrawealthy to protect their wealth so it can be handed on to heirs. And while those clients are still alive, his luxury resorts provide places for them to play. He also is the principal funder of the Catholic University of America business school that bears his name. (2) Leo, for years the executive vice president of the Federalist Society, has been the principal architect of the conservative makeup of the Supreme Court and the supply… Read more »

Anonymous
29 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

As institutions are retrenching and undergoing “renewals”, reductions in salaries is a fait accompli resulting from retirement of senior faculty (higher earners) and stagnant raises. Same phenomena as faculty get promoted.

At CUA, real wages has been declining each year for over a decade. A rough calculation shows this amounts to a full year of lost wages for most faculty and staff. Such as shame it is happening at a Catholic institution where the “dignity of work” is a key principle.

Anonymous
29 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

CUA can boast it’s been ahead of the curve. In underpaying faculty.

Anonymous
29 days ago

Another sign of CUA’s deep troubles on the enrollment front: Here is a list of colleges attended from 2018 through 2020 by graduates of Regis High School, the most prestigious Catholic high school in New York City. You’ll see Notre Dame, Holy Cross, and lesser Catholic colleges like University of Scranton and St. Joseph’s. But you won’t see a single kid going on to CUA in any of the three years covered by the list. https://www.regis.org/section/?id=121

Anonymous
29 days ago

All – If you have not already seen the document, the 2020-21, AAUP Faculty Compensation Survey Results are available.

Spoiler Alert – the results are disappointing.

See https://www.aaup.org/2020-21-faculty-compensation-survey-results

Anonymous
1 month ago

“Joe Biden’s surprising presidency”; 12 April 2021

This recent article by John Kenneth White, ordinary professor of politics at The Catholic University of America is well worth a read.

See https://www.post-gazette.com/news/insight/2021/04/12/Joe-Biden-surprising-presidency-John-Kenneth-White/stories/202104110053

Anonymous
1 month ago

FYI – “Should Colleges Require COVID-19 Vaccines For Fall? More Campuses Are Saying, Yes”

But this begs the question, what about the faculty, staff and administration?

https://www.kosu.org/post/should-colleges-require-covid-19-vaccines-fall-more-campuses-are-saying-yes

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

This is not technically an issue of begging the question, but I won’t quibble. It’s important to ask about faculty, staff and administrators on a campus, like CUA, where at least two faculty members in the Busch School have publicly stated they will forgo vaccination as a matter of “conscience.”

Anonymous
29 days ago
Reply to  Anonymous

U.S. colleges divided over requiring student COVID-19 vaccinations

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/education/u-s-colleges-divided-over-requiring-student-covid-19-vaccinations

CUA Alum of 1963
1 month ago

If you think that CUA has problems under President Garvey’s ultra-conservative management, the appended Time magazine article from March 1963 summarizes the situation at CUA under Rector McDonald. “Universities: Crisis at Catholic U.” http://img.timeinc.net/time/i/logo_time_print.gif Friday, Mar. 29, 1963 Catholic University in Washington, D.C., has a high aim—”to search out truth scientifically, to safeguard it, and to apply it”—qualified in practice by a timid feeling that now and then some of the truth has to be suppressed. The newest case of suppression has the school’s faculty in revolt and deeply worries many of the 239 Roman Catholic bishops in the U.S.,… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago

Wow. So CUA Admin has been doing the same foot shooting moves for almost 60 years. One additional point, that $1,500,000 collection in 1962 would equal $13 million today. My recollection is that we typically bring in half that.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Indeed, a long history of embarrassments (the engineering school lost accreditation!) that does much to explain how the university finds itself mired in mediocrity today.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The CUA School of Engineering is currently and has been accredited for as long as I can recall.

So, the Time magazine claim that the School of Engineering lost its accreditation in the 1950’s is news to me.

Can anyone substantiate this claim?

Anonymous
1 month ago

Look: a CATHOLIC university that is figuring out how to balance its identity with safety for its community.

https://www.stedwards.edu/healthy-hilltop

https://www.texastribune.org/2021/04/06/st-edwards-university-covid-19-vaccine/

Anonymous
1 month ago

Memories of Catholic University of America in 1963 – CUA forbade Dr Hans Küng from speaking on campus. 

See https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/06/world/europe/hans-kung-dead.html

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

This remembrance illustrates how far CUA has fallen in stature in the intervening half-century. Today, what’s newsworthy is who’s invited to speak at Notre Dame, not CUA.

Anonymous
1 month ago

I sure hope that CUA will follow Cornell University’s example.

Cornell will require vaccinations for students returning to campus in fall; expects full in-person learning

https://ithacavoice.com/2021/04/cornell-will-require-vaccinations-for-students-returning-to-campus-in-fall-expects-full-in-person-learning/

Anonymous
1 month ago

FYI – “Universities want in-person classes this fall. Vaccinating faculty is critical to their plans, but the rollout’s been uneven.”; 1 Apr 2021
See https://www.bizjournals.com/washington/news/2021/04/01/university-faculty-vaccines.html

Anonymous
1 month ago

What happens when you work for a respected, successful, well-managed university: https://www.gwhatchet.com/2021/03/30/officials-to-restore-faculty-and-staff-retirement-contributions-merit-salary-increases/

An Embarrassed CUA Alum
1 month ago

Speaking of US News rankings – The 2022 U.S. News Law School Rankings Are Here

The good news is that 6 universities in the Washington, DC area were included in the top 100 law schools.
Georgetown – 15
GWU – 27
George Mason – 41
University of Maryland – 50
American U – 81
Howard – 91

The bad news is that CUA’s law school was not included in the top 100.

See https://abovethelaw.com/2021/03/2022-us-news-law-school-rankings/

Anonymous
1 month ago

CUA Law finished right outside the top 100, at 102, which was 9-place improvement over the prior year. Still dismally mediocre, but better than further slippage, which is what the university as a whole has been experiencing. CUA is too weak to win recognition as a top university, but if it focused resources on a handful of its strongest programs, it might be able to boost their stature and, by doing so, earn some reflected glory for the rest of the school. Law, architecture, and the Rome school are three areas where it would be smart to concentrate resources with… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

I wonder if CUA’s Columbus School of Law has assembled its own task force focused on improving its ratings? This will be fairly costly but necessary if they want to improve their rankings. If the law school is just hoping that CUA’s senior administration will take the lead in improving the law school’s rankings, they need to be reminded that hope is not a strategy. Besides, CUA’s overall ranking has been tanking for the past 5 years and its senior administration does not seem to care. Maybe if each of CUA’s schools works on improving their own rankings, they can… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

There’s no need for a “task force.” US News rankings haunt every law school dean in America, 24/7. It’s never out of mind. It’s always about having enough money to (1) grant financial aid to applicants with the best numerical credentials, and (2) hire well-respected faculty. The current dean is solid, as was his predecessor, who had the misfortune of coming in just as the impact of the financial crisis was crashing down. CUA’s law school weathered the financial crisis worse than other schools, and recovered more slowly than competitors, but that’s because of historic financial weakness. If the university… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago

Something just doesn’t feel right here. Full disclosure – I am not aware of how the Columbus School of Law is doing these days re its enrollments and expense control and fundraising. But given CUA’s magnificent law school facilities, it’s highly respected faculty, its many successful alumni and it’s location just a few miles from the center of Washington, DC, it’s very difficult to accept the fact that there are 100 law school in the US ranked higher than CUA’s Columbus School of Law. Maybe CUA neglected to pay its US News subscription fees….:) More seriously, maybe CUA’s “management” decided… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

When law school enrollment dipped post-financial crisis, it reportedly had a significant adverse impact on the entire university’s budget. It’s hard to know with specificity, but that suggests the university milks the law school as a cash cow. If that’s the case, it holds the law school back. And prospective law school donors generally don’t want to write checks that are ultimately going to support the education of theology students, whether directly or by the university’s “administrative overhead” charges to the law school. See: https://leiterlawschool.typepad.com/leiter/2013/04/more-signs-of-the-times-declining-law-school-enrollment-leads-to-budget-cuts-across-the-entire-unive.html

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The above posting included an inoperative URL.

Try this instead

CUA Law’s Rank Tumbles as Admissions Standards Drop – March 2014

https://theredirect.wordpress.com/2014/03/11/cua-law-relegated-to-third-tier-rank-under-new-dean/

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

The law school was as high as #80 just seven years ago? That makes the current 102nd rank even harder to accept.

Anonymous
1 month ago

Here’s what demand for admission to a leading Catholic university’s law school looks like: https://www.insidehighered.com/admissions/article/2021/04/08/notre-dame-law-asks-students-compete-each-other-deposit-fastest

Anonymous
1 month ago

Props to the FA for trying to bring US News rankings to the attention of the BOT. It’s pointless to argue about their validity as a measure of quality; their importance to an institution’s fortunes is simply undeniable. CUA’s ranking started from an embarrassingly low point and has sunk even lower. It’s a subject that belongs on the agenda of every BOT meeting.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

If CUA’s BOT is unaware of the fact that CUA’s national rankings have been incredibly poor for the past decade, then the BOT is not performing its fiduciary duty and it should be replaced.

Unfortunately, I am confident that the BOT has been aware of CUA’s dismal national rankings and they just don’t care.

And the same comment holds for President Garvey as well.

One would think that Christopher Lydon, Vice President of Enrollment Management would be all over this situation – and maybe he is but we just can’t see it.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Further to the issue of accountability, what will happen to deans and their school-based advancement officers who fall miles short of their capital campaign goals, as many have so far?

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Their goals will be adjusted downward.

Anonymous
1 month ago

Average U.S. News Rankings for 123 Universities Over the Period: 2014-2021 

The US News university rankings profile is one metric for assessing the leadership of CUA’s President John Garvey over the past 8 years.

See https://publicuniversityhonors.com/2016/09/18/average-u-s-news-rankings-for-126-universities-2010-1017/ Catholic 121 116 123 124 120 129 139 143 Decline: -22

Clearly, this is not a metric that CUA’s BOT cares about.

Obviously, it is a metric that potential students and their parents do care about.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

How GWU Gamed the College Ranking System In The Late 1980’s The Prestige Racket by Daniel Luzer August 22, 2010 https://washingtonmonthly.com/2010/08/22/the-prestige-racket/ In the summer of 1961, a twenty-two-year-old college graduate from rural Nevada packed up his young family and moved to Washington, D.C. He took a job working nights as a U.S. Capitol policeman while by day he studied for a law degree in Foggy Bottom, at a local commuter school by the name of George Washington University Foggy Bottom in those days was an unfashionable neighborhood of State Department office buildings, apartment blocks, decrepit townhouses, bodegas, and parking lots. GW’s… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago

Marian University Names Engineering Dean

See https://www.insideindianabusiness.com/story/43561034/marian-university-names-engineering-dean

Congratulations to Professor Binh Tran on this well-deserved promotion.

Shame on the CUA Administration for losing yet another extremely valuable faculty member.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Is it not a feather in CUA Engineering’s cap — rather than a cause for shame — that a faculty member advances professionally?

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

CUA should indeed be proud when one of its faculty members advances professionally.

The point that you are missing is that CUA should be ashamed that such a faculty member must leave CUA to achieve advancement.

President Garvey and the BOT need to realize that the School of Engineering is not a cash cow that he can continue to starve.

The irony is that the current chairman of the BOT is a graduate of CUA’s School of Engineering and the CEO of a successful engineering company.

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

This highlights the challenge that CUA faces in claiming status as “The” CUA. In addition to the many better-known Catholic colleges, there is an obscure Catholic school like Marian, which draws enough donor support to endow a new named engineering school and, as recently as 2013, a medical school. There are plenty of Catholic universities out there that appear to be thriving while CUA can’t even keep a promise to modestly raise wages for faculty who are objectively underpaid and haven’t received increases in, what, a decade? There is a finite universe of benefactors interested in Catholic higher education. You… Read more »

Anonymous
1 month ago
Reply to  Anonymous

Corruption and greed of administration faculties and executive staffs.

Too much support to theology, Canon law, philosophy..